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  1. supada's Avatar
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    #1

    Yiddish

    In terms of yiddish word, can I say it in English sentence? People will understand me?

    Scenario : in front of the mall.
    Me : Hey, we need trolley.
    Her : Why? Just carry the bags yourself.
    Me : Poof! They have trolly! Why schlepp???

    Is it practical? Or it is understandable in a few group of people?

    Please help.

  2. SUDHKAMP's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Yiddish

    Quote Originally Posted by supada View Post
    In terms of yiddish word, can I say it in English sentence? People will understand me?

    Scenario : in front of the mall.
    Me : Hey, we need trolley.
    Her : Why? Just carry the bags yourself.
    Me : Poof! They have trolly! Why schlepp???

    Is it practical? Or it is understandable in a few group of people?

    Please help.
    I think the word is schlep(you have put one p too many) and it is a slang. Depends on the group of people whether they would like the slang being used or not.(The word derives from middle low German)

  3. supada's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Yiddish

    Thanks, Sudh.

    I heard this word from my Jewish teacher in the first place then I found it written on a guidepost in front of a mall so I wonder if this term is widely used and people would understand it publicly.

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    #4

    Re: Yiddish

    Quote Originally Posted by supada View Post
    Thanks, Sudh.

    I heard this word from my Jewish teacher in the first place then I found it written on a guidepost in front of a mall so I wonder if this term is widely used and people would understand it publicly.
    Dear Supada:

    Many Yiddish words are common in AmE. Schlep, chutzpah, kvetch, nebbish, klutz, etc. can be used and understood by many. It is more likely that they will be understood on the East and West coasts than in the Midwest, but they're in most dictionaries and sound perfectly normal to me.
    Where was the mall where you saw schlep on a guidepost? That would be unusual!

    Petra

  4. supada's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Yiddish

    Quote Originally Posted by pyoung View Post
    Dear Supada:

    Many Yiddish words are common in AmE. Schlep, chutzpah, kvetch, nebbish, klutz, etc. can be used and understood by many. It is more likely that they will be understood on the East and West coasts than in the Midwest, but they're in most dictionaries and sound perfectly normal to me.
    Where was the mall where you saw schlep on a guidepost? That would be unusual!

    Petra
    Dear Petra,

    Thanks for your explanation. I saw it at The Grove in Los Angeles. It was a small post suggesting their customers to
    take trolleys.

    Ooops maybe 'guidepost' wasn't what it was? Is it a proper word?

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    #6

    Re: Yiddish

    Dear Supada:

    A guidepost is usually a directional sign. But I knew what you meant. You could just call it a sign, or a signpost.

    Thanks for the information. I'd like to see that sign. It would make me smile. I think the fact that you saw it in L.A. lets you know that Yiddish words are in common use, in the US anyway.

    All best wishes,

    Petra

  5. supada's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Yiddish

    I see. Thanks very much, Petra. Your comment is very useful. :)

  6. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Yiddish

    As pyong mentioned, Yiddish words and expressions are more common in areas that have a large Jewish population (New York, areas of Los Angeles, etc.). However, thanks to some popular TV shows like The Nanny and Seinfeld, more of mainstream America has become familiar with a large number of common Yiddish expressions. For example, even my father-in-law, who lives in a very rural area of Georgia, knows what "schlep" means.

  7. supada's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Yiddish

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post
    As pyong mentioned, Yiddish words and expressions are more common in areas that have a large Jewish population (New York, areas of Los Angeles, etc.). However, thanks to some popular TV shows like The Nanny and Seinfeld, more of mainstream America has become familiar with a large number of common Yiddish expressions. For example, even my father-in-law, who lives in a very rural area of Georgia, knows what "schlep" means.
    Thanks, Ouisch.

  8. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Yiddish

    A anecdote from England: When I was editing a book by Gary Karr - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia , an English reader suggested that his "The trouble with a Double Bass is that you have to schlep it around wherever you go" should have the word replaced with "hump". Luckily the suggestion was dismissed on the grounds of an unfortunate double entendre.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 14-Dec-2008 at 22:51. Reason: Last word changed - not a pun

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