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  1. beachboy's Avatar
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    #1

    to come a long way

    John has improved his pronunciation a lot.
    He has come a long way in terms of pronunciation.
    He has come a long way in pronunciation.
    Are the second and third sentences ok? Do the three of them have the same meaning? Can this expression ever be followed by preposition ON?

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    #2

    Re: to come a long way

    Hello BB,

    Yes, #2 and #3 sound fine to me; though #3 might be an unexpected combination.

    #2 suggests a wider context (e.g. "he has come a long way [in his knowledge of English] in terms of pronunciation"), whereas #3 focuses on pronunciation only.

    I can't think of an example with "on"; but perhaps another member can!

    All the best,

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.

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    #3

    Re: to come a long way

    We can say that his pronunciation has come on with the same meaning, but using it with the whole phrase escapes me.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to come a long way

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    John has improved his pronunciation a lot.
    He has come a long way in terms of pronunciation.
    He has come a long way in pronunciation.
    Are the second and third sentences ok? Do the three of them have the same meaning? Can this expression ever be followed by preposition ON?
    You can follow "improve" with "on" or "over":

    John's end-of-term marks for pronunciation were an improvement on last term's.
    John's EOT performance in pronunciation had improved on last term's.


    I don't believe I've ever met "on" used this way after the phrase 'come a long way', though of course when 'come a long way' is not a phrasal verb, and the "on" belongs to another phrase, the words sometimes do come together:
    'He had come a long way on the pretext of delivering the parcel, but he really just wanted to see her one last time.'

    b

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