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    #1

    take after

    Andrew Smodley is a natural worrier. It is something he has ......... from his father the king of all worriers.

    Hi,
    I think I can fill the blank with "inherited". Can I also say "he has took after his father..."?
    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: take after

    Andrew Smodley is a natural worrier. It is something he has......... from his father the king of all worriers.

    Hi,
    I think I can fill the blank with "inherited". Yes. Or: It is something he inherited from his father. Can I also say "he has took after his father..."? No.
    Thanks.

    To take after is a phrasal verb. It means to resemble (physically or in temperament) someone else, usually a relative of a previous generation.

    Andrew takes after his father: they are both big worriers.
    Andrew's father is the king of worriers. Andrew takes after him in that respect.
    Andrew takes after his father, the king of worriers.
    The present tense is best here, because worrying is a characteristic Andrew exhibits in the present.

    has took does not exist in English. He takes, he took, he has taken.

    I hope this is helpful,

    Petra

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    #3

    Re: take after

    Quote Originally Posted by pyoung View Post
    Andrew Smodley is a natural worrier. It is something he has......... from his father — the king of all worriers.

    Hi,
    I think I can fill the blank with "inherited". Yes. Or: It is something he inherited from his father. Can I also say "he has took after his father..."? No.
    Thanks.

    To take after is a phrasal verb. It means to resemble (physically or in temperament) someone else, usually a relative of a previous generation.

    Andrew takes after his father: they are both big worriers.
    Andrew's father is the king of worriers. Andrew takes after him in that respect.
    Andrew takes after his father, the king of worriers.
    The present tense is best here, because worrying is a characteristic Andrew exhibits in the present.

    has took does not exist in English. He takes, he took, he has taken.

    I hope this is helpful,

    Petra
    Thanks.

    I meant "has taken"! I always get confused with the tenses! Sorry!

    Anyways, the present tense is more appropriate for ''to take after'', right?

    Thanks again.

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      • American English
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    #4

    Re: take after

    Dear jctgf:

    If the person is presently 'taking after' whoever it is/was they resemble, then yes, use the present: 'Joe takes after his father. They both love hunting and fishing.'
    However, if the person is no longer alive, then, of course, you will use a past tense verb: 'My mom told me that her brother took after my grandfather in every way.' (assuming the brother has died)

    (And, as for verb tenses...I am always trying to improve my Spanish, but those verb tenses! I don't know if I will master them in this lifetime!!)

    Petra

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