Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 559
    #1

    the...the...

    Hi teachers

    I often see comparatives with the...the... when I read or listen to English. Here are some examples.

    The older I get, the happier I am.
    The more I learn, the more I forget.
    The more books you read the more you'll learn.

    I thought until recently that two pairs of " the + comparative" are always used together. So I was a little confused when I saw the sentence below when I was reading a passage regarding breast-feeding.

    "..The study, conducted on 3,253 people born from 1959 to 1961, found that their scores on IQ tests rose gradually the longer they had been breast-fed as babies..."

    In the sentence above, there's only one pair of "the + comparative". Is it common to use only a set of "the plus comparative" like this?

    OP
    Last edited by optimistic pessimist; 18-Dec-2008 at 06:55.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #2

    Re: the...the...

    Quote Originally Posted by optimistic pessimist View Post
    Hi teachers

    I often see comparatives with the...the... when I read or listen to English. Here are some examples.

    The older I get, the happier I am.
    The more I learn, the more I forget.
    The more books you read the more you'll learn.

    I thought until recently that two pairs of " the + comparative" are always used together. So I was a little confused when I saw the sentence below when I was reading a passage regarding breast-feeding.

    "..The study, conducted on 3,253 people born from 1959 to 1961, found that their scores on IQ tests rose gradually the longer they had been breast-fed as babies..."

    In the sentence above, there' only one pair of "the plus comparative". Is this common to use only a set of "the plus comparative" like this?

    OP
    There is a comparison there, but it is just phrased differently.
    It means "The longer one is breast-fed, the higher one's IQ is likely to be".

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 559
    #3

    Re: the...the...

    Hi teahers!

    Raymott, thank you for your reply.

    I'd like to ask one more thing about this. Which sentence is correct when you try to encourage your students to read books?

    1. The more books you read, the more you learn.
    2. The more books you read, the more you'll learn.
    3. The more books you'll read, the more you learn.
    4. The more books you'll read, the more you'll learn.

    I assume #1 and #4 are okay, but I'm not 100 percent sure. Only about 75 percent sure.

    Thank you.

    OP

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #4

    Re: the...the...

    Quote Originally Posted by optimistic pessimist View Post
    Hi teahers!

    Raymott, thank you for your reply.

    I'd like to ask one more thing about this. Which sentence is correct when you try to encourage your students to read books?

    1. The more books you read, the more you learn.
    2. The more books you read, the more you'll learn.
    3. The more books you'll read, the more you learn.
    4. The more books you'll read, the more you'll learn.

    I assume #1 and #4 are okay, but I'm not 100 percent sure. Only about 75 percent sure.

    Thank you.

    OP
    The first two are correct. The last two aren't.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •