Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,860
    #1

    ''I've sent'' and ''I sent''

    1. I've sent you an email with the information you've requested me.

    2. I've sent you an email with the information you requested me.

    3. I sent you an email with the information you've requested me.

    4. I sent you an email with the information you requested me.

    Hi,

    Are all these possibilities correct, please?

    As long as I'm not specifying the time the action occurred, I'd say that only #1 is possible.

    Or, is it incorrect to use the past continuous in both sentences of the same phrase?

    Is there a grammar rule for it?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by jctgf; 21-Dec-2008 at 16:42.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #2

    Re: ''I've sent'' and ''I sent''

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    1. i've sent you an email with the information you've requested me.

    2. i've sent you an email with the information you requested me.

    3. i sent you an email with the information you've requested me.

    4. i sent you an email with the information you requested me.

    hi,

    are all these possibilities correct, please? they are all wrong because "requested me" is wrong. You can say 'requested' or 'requested from me' or 'requested me to send'.

    as long as i'm not specifying the time the action occurred, i'd say that only #1 is possible.

    Or, is it incorrect to use the past continuous in both sentences of the same phrase?

    Is there a grammar rule for it? a good rule for a student is to first consider using simple past tense. If simple past tense seems to clearly express your meaning, use simple past tense.
    only use something more complicated if you decide or someone else tells you that you need something more complicated.

    you need only simple past tense in both places in that sentence.
    'i sent you an email with the information you requested.'


    more than a few people, especially british speakers, may say 'i've sent............you requested.', and they may try to convince you that that is the correct answer. My feeling is that using "i've" is just their habit and that there is no grammatical necessity for using "i've".

    (even i use "i've" sometimes, but again it is just a habit.)

    thanks.
    2006

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,860
    #3

    Re: ''I've sent'' and ''I sent''

    Thanks a lot.
    Isn't it true that when I don't specify the time, I have to use the past continuous?
    1. I've seen you. When? Yesterday!
    2. I saw you yesterday.
    Thanks again.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #4

    Re: ''I've sent'' and ''I sent''

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    Thanks a lot.
    Isn't it true that when I don't specify the time, I have to use the past continuous?
    1. I've seen you. When? Yesterday!
    2. I saw you yesterday.
    Thanks again.
    "I've seen you." is not past continuous; it's present perfect. And no, you don't have to use present perfect.

    I saw you.
    when?
    yesterday

  1. Offroad's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 2,817
    #5

    Re: ''I've sent'' and ''I sent''

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    more than a few people, especially british speakers, may say 'i've sent............you requested.', and they may try to convince you that that is the correct answer. My feeling is that using "i've" is just their habit and that there is no grammatical necessity for using "i've".

    (even i use "i've" sometimes, but again it is just a habit.)
    Well, it seems that Americans use present perfect in a different way, and, to be more precise, I think they don't like the present perfect. And... we all know they have influenced many cultures out there. In a few decades, the world will speak AmE.

    in AmE the simple past is used to give news:
    Did you hear? Russia declared war on ...

    it sould be:
    Have you heard? Russia has declared war on ...

    We use the present perfect especially to say that a finished action or event is connected with the present in some way. If we say that something has happened, we are thinking about the past and the present at the same time.

    Joe has passed his exam! He got 87%.
    I can't go out because I have broken my leg.
    I've known her for years.

    JC, uma tradução ao pé da letra não ajuda, pelo contrário, atrapalha, e muito.
    Last edited by Offroad; 22-Dec-2008 at 17:36.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #6

    Re: ''I've sent'' and ''I sent''

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    well, it seems that americans use present perfect in a different way, and, to be more precise, i think they don't like the present perfect. And... We all know they have influenced many cultures out there.:-d in a few decades, the world will speak ame.
    (as far as i can speak for americans,) i am not sure you can say americans "don't like the present perfect", because they use it. But they realize that very often it is just one way to say something, not the only correct way. Americans might say that british speakers like present perfect too much.
    this is one of the differences between the two englishes, and of course if you want to follow british english, you can.

    in ame the simple past is used to give news:
    did you hear? Russia declared war on ... the meaning is very clear.

    it sould be:
    have you heard? Russia has declared war on ... this is only your opinion! The meaning is perfectly clear with simple past. Perfect tense adds nothing to the meaning.

    we use the present perfect especially to say that a finished action or event is connected with the present in some way.
    but the simple past also often shows connection with the present. if we say that something has happened, we are thinking about the past and the present at the same time.

    joe has passed his exam! He got 87%. simple past is all you need.
    i can't go out because i have broken my leg. simple past is all you need.

    i've known her for years. this is an example in which simple past would not work, and american speakers would also use present perfect.
    (actually, one could also say 'i know here for years.' i don't mean that this is as commonly said as the blue sentence, but its meaning is clear. Sometimes things are said largely out of habit, and the repititon of the habit makes us think that that is the only correct way.


    what i would say is don't always blindly follow rules. Yes sometimes rules help a lot, but some rules only apply sometimes. And sometimes the rules must be very confusing to learners.
    we should also consider the actual words in a sentence, and decide if the words are saying what we want them to say.

    jc, uma tradução ao pé da letra não ajuda, pelo contrário, atrapalha, e muito.
    2006

  2. Offroad's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 2,817
    #7

    Smile Re: ''I've sent'' and ''I sent''

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    i've known her for years. this is an example in which simple past would not work, and american speakers would also use present perfect.
    (actually, one could also say 'i know here for years.' i don't mean that this is as commonly said as the blue sentence, but its meaning is clear. Sometimes things are said largely out of habit, and the repititon of the habit makes us think that that is the only correct way.

    what i would say is don't always blindly follow rules. Yes sometimes rules help a lot, but some rules only apply sometimes. And sometimes the rules must be very confusing to learners.
    we should also consider the actual words in a sentence, and decide if the words are saying what we want them to say.
    2006
    Well, I am almost sure American grammar books don't teach students to say: I never saw something like this before.
    The meaning is clear, but the particle 'before' requests the present perfect.
    Honestly, I have never seen something like that before!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,860
    #8

    Re: ''I've sent'' and ''I sent''

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Well, it seems that Americans use present perfect in a different way, and, to be more precise, I think they don't like the present perfect. And... we all know they have influenced many cultures out there. In a few decades, the world will speak AmE.

    in AmE the simple past is used to give news:
    Did you hear? Russia declared war on ...

    it sould be:
    Have you heard? Russia has declared war on ...

    We use the present perfect especially to say that a finished action or event is connected with the present in some way. If we say that something has happened, we are thinking about the past and the present at the same time.

    Joe has passed his exam! He got 87%.
    I can't go out because I have broken my leg.
    I've known her for years.

    JC, uma tradução ao pé da letra não ajuda, pelo contrário, atrapalha, e muito.
    but... who's talking about ''literal translation"?

  3. Offroad's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 2,817
    #9

    Smile Re: ''I've sent'' and ''I sent''

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    but... who's talking about ''literal translation"?
    Thumbs up!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,860
    #10

    Re: ''I've sent'' and ''I sent''

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    2006

    Thanks!

    It's very nice to know that the present continuous is not that important for the Canadian English.

    Thanks a lot.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •