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    #1

    profound cogitation, to stew himself slowwly, melting out, to simmer, to ooze forth

    Dear teachers,

    There is a brief excerpt fom Dickens’ “Burnaby Rudge”. Probably the present Dickens’ work is a hard nut to crack. It won’t be easy for me to understand the meaning of some passages from the book such as the following excerpt.

    Would you be kind enough to convert the present excerpt from the Dickens’ book into an understandable passage?

    On this same day, and about this very hour, Mr Willet the elder sat smoking his pipe in a chamber at the Black Lion. Although it was hot summer weather, Mr Willet sat close to the fire. He was in a state of profound cogitation, with his own thoughts, and it was his custom at such times to stew himself slowly, under the impression that that process of cookery was favourable to the melting out of his ideas, which, when he began to simmer, sometimes oozed forth so copiously as to astonish even himself.

    profound = coming as if from the depths of one's being: profound contempt.

    cogitation = thoughtful consideration; meditation.

    stew himself slowly

    stew (v) = brood (v) = to be in a state of anxiety or agitation. · To be deep in thought; meditate.
    · To focus the attention on a subject persistently and moodily; worry: brooded over the insult for several days.

    stewing over her upcoming trial;

    melting out

    melt (v) = to cause to disappear gradually; disperse

    1. simmer (v) = · To be filled with pent-up emotion; seethe.
    2. To be in a state of gentle ferment: thoughts simmering in the back of her mind.

    ooze (v) = to flow or leak out slowly, as through small openings; to emit or radiate in abundance

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 810
    #2

    Re: profound cogitation, to stew himself slowwly, melting out, to simmer, to ooze for

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    There is a brief excerpt fom Dickens’ “Burnaby Rudge”. Probably the present Dickens’ work is a hard nut to crack. It won’t be easy for me to understand the meaning of some passages from the book such as the following excerpt.

    Would you be kind enough to convert the present excerpt from the Dickens’ book into an understandable passage?

    On this same day, and about this very hour, Mr Willet the elder sat smoking his pipe in a chamber at the Black Lion. Although it was hot summer weather, Mr Willet sat close to the fire. He was in a state of profound cogitation, with his own thoughts, and it was his custom at such times to stew himself slowly, under the impression that that process of cookery was favourable to the melting out of his ideas, which, when he began to simmer, sometimes oozed forth so copiously as to astonish even himself.


    V.
    A state of profound cogitation could be an intense period of reflection, of deep thought and consideration. The proceedure carried out by the mind while in this state is described with a culinary analogy, explaining Mr Willet's method of Thinking.

    And it's all done very well!

    But Vil,

    What do you mean by this sentence:

    Probably the present Dickens’ work is a hard nut to crack.

    It isn't clear.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
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    #3

    Re: profound cogitation, to stew himself slowwly, melting out, to simmer, to ooze for

    Hi colloquim,

    Thank you for your credible explanation.

    Probably the present Dickens’ work is a hard nut to crack.= it is very hard for understanding and translationin my natural language.I have to undertake a task bewond my strentgth ot this task is beyond my ability.

    There is a brief explanation of the expression “hard nut to crack” namely “Also, tough nut to crack. A difficult problem; also, an individual who is difficult to deal with. For example, This assignment is a hard nut to crack, or It won't be easy getting her approval; she's a tough nut to crack. This metaphoric expression alludes to hard-shelled nuts like walnuts”. In the present case I make an analogy and accept the idea that a subject could be also a hard nut to crack similarly as an individual is that sort of.

    Thank you again for your backing my frenzied efforts to adopt English language.

    Regards,

    V


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 810
    #4

    Re: profound cogitation, to stew himself slowwly, melting out, to simmer, to ooze for

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Thank you again for your backing my frenzied efforts to adopt English language.

    Regards,

    V
    I have to commend you for approaching Dickens; and I think the passage you quoted is great, but certainly not easy by any means (for native and non-native speakers alike).

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