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  1. outofdejavu's Avatar
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    #1

    comparative-"than anyone else" & "than everyone else"

    Dear All:

    1. Tom is taller than anyone else in his class.
    2. Tom is taller than everyone else in his class.

    Do these two sentence mean the same thing (Tom is the tallest in his class)?
    I fail to detect the differences.

    3. The best weaver should have a larger coat than anyone else.
    (A sentence quoted from Gorgias‎ by Plato and Robin Waterfiel)

    4. Julius was less affected than anyone else by the treatment program.
    (A sentence quoted from The Drinking Man‎ by David Clarence McClelland)

    If I changed "anyone" to "everyone" in #3 and #4, would the meanings differ?

    5.
    Roosevelt was president from 1933 to 1945, longer than anyone else in American history.
    If I changed "anyone" to "everyone" in #5, I can sense the meaning is different, but I cannot specify the differences.



    Best Wishes
    Last edited by outofdejavu; 24-Dec-2008 at 09:34.

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: comparative-"than anyone else" & "than everyone else"

    Quote Originally Posted by outofdejavu View Post
    Dear All:

    1. Tom is taller than anyone else in his class.
    2. Tom is taller than everyone else in his class.

    Do these two sentence mean the same thing (Tom is the tallest in his class)? No, the second sentence has a different meaning. everyone else can be used loosely to mean "the majority of students "
    I fail to detect the differences.

    3. The best weaver should have a larger coat than anyone else.
    (A sentence quoted from Gorgias‎ by Plato and Robin Waterfiel)

    4. Julius was less affected than anyone else by the treatment program.
    (A sentence quoted from The Drinking Man‎ by David Clarence McClelland)

    If I changed "anyone" to "everyone" in #3 and #4, would the meanings differ?



    Best Wishes
    Yes the meaning will be different, 'anyone else' means: "any other person" excluding the speaker or any person specifically described. Look at the example below:
    I haven't seen anyone else here besides you and me.
    Where as 'everyone else' means: "every person" including the speaker. In the above example you can not replace anyone with every one.

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