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    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    has so often to be glad of the dews of heaven to heal the hot cut of the scythe.

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me an interpretation to in “easy English language” to the phrase in bold in the following excerpt from the George MacDonald's “Donal Grant”?

    Bonnet in hand he advanced to meet Kate Graeme. She held out to him a well-shaped, good-sized hand, not ignorant of work--capable indeed of milking a cow to the cow's satisfaction. Then he saw that her chin was strong, and her dark hair not too tidy; that she was rather tall, and slenderly conceived though plumply carried out. Her light approach pleased him. He liked the way her foot pressed the grass. If Donal loved anything in the green world, it was neither roses nor hollyhocks, nor even sweet peas, but the grass that is trodden under foot, that springs in all waste places, and has so often to be glad of the dews of heaven to heal the hot cut of the scythe. He had long abjured the notion of anything in the vegetable kingdom being without some sense of life, without pleasure and pain also, in mild form and degree.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: has so often to be glad of the dews of heaven to heal the hot cut of the scythe.

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to give me an interpretation to in “easy English language” to the phrase in bold in the following excerpt from the George MacDonald's “Donal Grant”?

    Bonnet in hand he advanced to meet Kate Graeme. She held out to him a well-shaped, good-sized hand, not ignorant of work--capable indeed of milking a cow to the cow's satisfaction. Then he saw that her chin was strong, and her dark hair not too tidy; that she was rather tall, and slenderly conceived though plumply carried out. Her light approach pleased him. He liked the way her foot pressed the grass. If Donal loved anything in the green world, it was neither roses nor hollyhocks, nor even sweet peas, but the grass that is trodden under foot, that springs in all waste places, and has so often to be glad of the dews of heaven to heal the hot cut of the scythe. He had long abjured the notion of anything in the vegetable kingdom being without some sense of life, without pleasure and pain also, in mild form and degree.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    The cool dew relieves the grass of the pain from the cut inflicted by the scythe.

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