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    #1

    polysemy

    ‘Volume’ means a big book; it also means a big quantity and a big sound.

    Can I say this is an example of polysemy?


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    #2

    Re: polysemy

    Quote Originally Posted by Fame View Post
    ‘Volume’ means a big book; it also means a big quantity and a big sound.

    Can I say this is an example of polysemy?
    Hi Fame,

    It seems like a clear example of polysemy to me.

    Matthew Balson
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    #3

    Re: polysemy

    Quote Originally Posted by Fame View Post
    ‘Volume’ means a big book; it also means a big quantity and a big sound.

    Can I say this is an example of polysemy?
    'Volume' doesn't actually have to be big in any of these cases.

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    #4

    Re: polysemy

    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi Fame,

    There are a few words which elucidate the matter in question as well as bear testimony to your speculation.

    polysemy [poli‐see‐mi], a linguistic term for a word's capacity to carry two or more distinct meanings, e.g. grave: ‘serious’ or ‘tomb’ (see also homonym). In some modern linguistic and literary theory, it is argued that all signs are polysemic, and the term has been extended to larger units including entire literary works.

    volume = a collection of written or printed sheets bound together; a book, one of the books of a work printed and bound in more than one book
    volume = the amplitude or loudness of a sound
    volume = great extent, amount, or dimension. amplitude, bulk, magnitude, mass, size. See big/small/amount.
    voice of great volume
    volume = a control, as on a radio, for adjusting amplitude or loudness
    to turn up the volume
    to turn down the volume
    volume = amount; quantity: a low volume of business; a considerable volume of lumber
    to tell volumes about (eloquent, fair-spoken)
    to speak volumes about

    Regards,

    V.


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    #5

    Re: polysemy

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    'Volume' doesn't actually have to be big in any of these cases.
    Yes, I think the common seme isn't 'big' but 'amount'. And this 'amount' is understood as a value (or unit) on a scale. The scale could be a collection of books, a range of sound, etc. Besides, the volume itself is measurable entity. A book has a certain number of pages and a sound - a level of decibels.

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