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  1. banderas's Avatar
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    #1

    Progress and the opposite to it

    What is the opposite to making progress with a language?
    I made progress with my English.

    My English went backwards or
    I went backwards with my English as I have not used it for long.

    Are these sentences correct to you?

  2. engee30's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Progress and the opposite to it

    I would say:

    My English has regressed.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Progress and the opposite to it

    'My English deteriorated because I hadn't used it for so long.' or 'My English has deteriorated because I haven't used it for so long.'

  4. banderas's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Progress and the opposite to it

    How about "My English became worse/worsened as I have not used it for so long?"

  5. SUDHKAMP's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Progress and the opposite to it

    [quote/]What is the opposite to making progress with a language?
    I made progress with my English.

    My English went backwards or
    I went backwards with my English as I have not used it for long.

    Are these sentences correct to you? How about "My English became worse/worsened as I have not used it for so long?" [quote/]

    I would suggest:
    My English became obsolete for want of practise.

    Or

    As I could not polish my English regularly, I lost the sheen.
    Last edited by SUDHKAMP; 06-Jan-2009 at 01:48. Reason: spelling mistake

  6. banderas's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Progress and the opposite to it

    for want of practise? What does that mean?

  7. engee30's Avatar
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    #7

    Cool Re: Progress and the opposite to it

    Quote Originally Posted by banderas View Post
    for want of practise? What does that mean?
    for lack of

  8. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Progress and the opposite to it

    Quote Originally Posted by SUDHKAMP View Post
    [quote/]What is the opposite to making progress with a language?
    I made progress with my English.

    My English went backwards or
    I went backwards with my English as I have not used it for long.

    Are these sentences correct to you? How about "My English became worse/worsened as I have not used it for so long?" [quote/]

    I would suggest:
    My English became obsolete for want of practise.

    Or

    As I could not polish my English regularly, I lost the shin.
    I wouldn't use 'obsolete' in this context SUDH.

  9. BobK's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Progress and the opposite to it

    Following on from Sudhkamp's last example (in which I suppose you meant "sheen" rather than 'shin' - which is the bone in the front of the lower leg), you could say 'My English used to be OK when I used it regularly, but now it's a bit rusty'.

    b

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