Results 1 to 7 of 7

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 62
    #1

    Talking hallucination and illusion

    Dear teacher,
    What is the difference between hallucination and illusion???
    Thanks


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #2

    Re: hallucination and illusion

    Quote Originally Posted by aya_aya7121 View Post
    Dear teacher,
    What is the difference between hallucination and illusion???
    Thanks
    Hallucinations - are a symptom of psychic disorder. Mentally sick people really see things that do not exist at the moment.
    Illusions - are something most people have when they think of reality better than it is. While hallucinations are pictures, illusions are more about ideas, opinions.
    Last edited by Clark; 08-Jan-2009 at 20:07. Reason: spelling mistake

  1. banderas's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 1,512
    #3

    Re: hallucination and illusion

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    Hallusinations - are a symptom of psychic disorder. Mentally sick people really see things that do not exist at the moment.
    Illusions - are something most people have when they think of reality better than it is. While hallusinations are pictures, illusions are more about ideas, opinions.
    Well explained but come on, Clark, get the spelling right!


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #4

    Re: hallucination and illusion

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    Hallucinations - are a symptom of psychic disorder. Mentally sick people really see things that do not exist at the moment.
    Illusions - are something most people have when they think of reality better than it is. While hallucinations are pictures, illusions are more about ideas, opinions.
    Spelling's corrected.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #5

    Re: hallucination and illusion

    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi aya-aya7121,

    There are some more explanatory words as well as further information in the form of a few examples concerning the matter in question.

    Hallucinations are false or distorted sensory experiences that appear to be real perceptions. These sensory impressions are generated by the mind rather than by any external stimuli, and may be seen, heard, felt, and even smelled or tasted. They can appear in the form of visions, voices or sounds, tactile feelings (known as haptic hallucinations), smells, or tastes. Hallucinations differ from illusions, which are changes in the perception of a real object. The English word "hallucination" comes from the Latin verb hallucinari, which means "to wander in the mind."

    Ilusion - An erroneous perception of reality. Something, such as a fantastic plan or desire, that causes an erroneous belief or perception. A mistaken or erroneous perception of an object external to the individual. In some cases, the laws of physics explain the errors. In others, the explanation lies with the perceiver. Illusions should be distinguished from hallucinations, which are perceptions that lack external stimuli, and delusions, which are false beliefs. The term illusion refers to a specific form of sensory distortion. Unlike a hallucination, which is a distortion in the absence of a stimulus, an illusion describes a misinterpretation of a true sensation. For example, hearing voices regardless of the environment would be a hallucination, whereas hearing voices in the sound of running water (or other auditory source) would be an illusion. It is important to distinguish between hallucinations and illusions or delusions, as the terms are often confused in conversation and popular journalism. A hallucination is a distorted sensory experience that appears to be a perception of something real even though it is not caused by an external stimulus. For example, some elderly people who have been recently bereaved may have hallucinations in which they "see" the dead loved one. An illusion, by contrast, is a mistaken or false interpretation of a real sensory experience, as when a traveler in the desert sees what looks like a pool of water, but in fact is a mirage caused by the refraction of light as it passes through layers of air of different densities. The bluish-colored light is a real sensory stimulus, but mistaking it for water is an illusion.

    Regards,

    V.


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #6

    Re: hallucination and illusion

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi aya-aya7121,

    There are some more explanatory words as well as further information in the form of a few examples concerning the matter in question.

    Hallucinations are false or distorted sensory experiences that appear to be real perceptions. These sensory impressions are generated by the mind rather than by any external stimuli, and may be seen, heard, felt, and even smelled or tasted. They can appear in the form of visions, voices or sounds, tactile feelings (known as haptic hallucinations), smells, or tastes. Hallucinations differ from illusions, which are changes in the perception of a real object. The English word "hallucination" comes from the Latin verb hallucinari, which means "to wander in the mind."

    Ilusion - An erroneous perception of reality. Something, such as a fantastic plan or desire, that causes an erroneous belief or perception. A mistaken or erroneous perception of an object external to the individual. In some cases, the laws of physics explain the errors. In others, the explanation lies with the perceiver. Illusions should be distinguished from hallucinations, which are perceptions that lack external stimuli, and delusions, which are false beliefs. The term illusion refers to a specific form of sensory distortion. Unlike a hallucination, which is a distortion in the absence of a stimulus, an illusion describes a misinterpretation of a true sensation. For example, hearing voices regardless of the environment would be a hallucination, whereas hearing voices in the sound of running water (or other auditory source) would be an illusion. It is important to distinguish between hallucinations and illusions or delusions, as the terms are often confused in conversation and popular journalism. A hallucination is a distorted sensory experience that appears to be a perception of something real even though it is not caused by an external stimulus. For example, some elderly people who have been recently bereaved may have hallucinations in which they "see" the dead loved one. An illusion, by contrast, is a mistaken or false interpretation of a real sensory experience, as when a traveler in the desert sees what looks like a pool of water, but in fact is a mirage caused by the refraction of light as it passes through layers of air of different densities. The bluish-colored light is a real sensory stimulus, but mistaking it for water is an illusion.

    Regards,

    V.
    I'm not a doctor.

    Vil, could you elaborate on delusions? There are only a few words about them in your post. I'm very interested to know what kind of false beliefs they are associated with.
    Last edited by Clark; 10-Jan-2009 at 19:21.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #7

    Re: hallucination and illusion

    Hi Clark,

    A delusion is a false belief that a person maintains in spite of evidence to the contrary and in spite of proof that other members of their culture do not share the belief. For example, some people insist that they have seen flying saucers or unidentified flying objects (UFOs) even though the objects they have filmed or photographed can be shown to be ordinary aircraft, weather balloons, satellites, etc.

    There is a link where you might find further information in order to gratify your curiosity.

    delusion: Definition, Synonyms from Answers.com

    Regards,

    V.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •