Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 72
    #1

    The and Related Issues

    Hi, how are you?

    [1] Pour in the glass the soda you were given.
    [2] Drink the coke and go right away. Or, you will be late for school.
    [3] Time is running out. But sip the juice and go right away. It's good for your health.

    If you were said the above, would you pour/drink/sip all?

    [4] People in the gym seemed to be enjoying the music.
    [5] People in the gym were enjoying the music.
    [6] Residents evacuated the district, and came to the shelter. The people seemed extremely worried.

    In [4] to [6], does the author mean all the people who were in the gym/who evacuated the district?

    Your help would be greatly appreciated.
    Have a good day!

    Hiro/ Sendai, Japan
    Last edited by HSS; 11-Jan-2009 at 09:12. Reason: Typo: appreciated] >>> appreciated.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,910
    #2

    Re: The and Related Issues

    1 I'd change the word order - pour the soda you were given in the glass - and while it refers to all, the person could pour half now and the rest later.
    2, Yes, though you could say 'drink up' to clarify.
    3, 'Sip the juice' implies drinking it more slowly than time would allow in your example and does not suggest drinking all of it to me.

    4 & 5 The author probably means all of the people that he or she could see but leaves a bit of room for manoeuvre by not using the definite article, especially in the first where 'seemed' is also inconclusive.
    6 Possibly, but the natural form to use in this instance would be 'they', so it is possible that the field of reference is wider- residents + some other people mentioned earlier. Do you have the context for this or is it a made-up example?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 72
    #3

    Re: The and Related Issues

    Quote Originally Posted by HSS View Post
    [4] People in the gym seemed to be enjoying the music.
    [5] People in the gym were enjoying the music.
    [6] Residents evacuated the district, and came to the shelter. The people seemed extremely worried.

    In [4] to [6], does the author mean all the people who were in the gym/who evacuated the district?
    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    4 & 5 The author probably means all of the people that he or she could see but leaves a bit of room for manoeuvre by not using the definite article, especially in the first where 'seemed' is also inconclusive.

    Do you have the context for this or is it a made-up example?
    [5]: What if you see "'The' people in the gym were enjoying the music" where there is no mention of 'the' people, or anybody or anything for that matter, before that sentence? Would you presume the author mean all the people who were in the gym?

    Hiro/ Sendai, Japan

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •