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    • Join Date: Jan 2009
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    #1

    pacifier

    Hello,
    I'd like to know if the word "pacifier" comes from "peace", please. The reason for my question is that this word is very similar to "pacific" and the goal of the gadget actually seems to "calm down" the baby, especially when they are crying out of control.
    Thanks a lot.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: pacifier

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDoe View Post
    Hello,
    I'd like to know if the word "pacifier" comes from "peace", please. The reason for my question is that this word is very similar to "pacific" and the goal of the gadget actually seems to "calm down" the baby, especially when they are crying out of control.
    Thanks a lot.
    "Comes from" isn't the best way of saying it, but it's certainly strongly related through the Latin pax, pacis (peace). Incidentally, the word isn't widely used in British English in that sense (though it may getting more 'air-pay' through retailers who market on both sides of the Atlantic. The Br English is "dummy".

    b


    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 32
    #3

    Re: pacifier

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    "Comes from" isn't the best way of saying it, but it's certainly strongly related through the Latin pax, pacis(peace). Incidentally, the word isn't widely used in British English in that sense (though it may getting more 'air-pay' through retailers who market on both sides of the Atlantic. The Br English is "dummy".

    b
    I have a few doubts, please.
    When I said ''comes from'' I wanted to convey "derive" or "is generated from". Do you think that ''comes from'' isn't appropriate because ''derive'' also is not or because ''come from'' isn't meant to be used in such a way?
    Also, I'm not sure if you agree or not that the American ''pacifier'' may bear this name because it calms down the baby.
    Thank you.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: pacifier

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDoe View Post
    I have a few doubts, please.
    When I said ''comes from'' I wanted to convey "derive" or "is generated from". Do you think that ''comes from'' isn't appropriate because ''derive'' also is not or because ''come from'' isn't meant to be used in such a way?
    Also, I'm not sure if you agree or not that the American ''pacifier'' may bear this name because it calms down the baby.
    Thank you.
    Yes, that's just what I'm saying. The word (not the object) "pacifier" comes from (or 'is derived from') the word for peace (in Latin). It is related also to the word "peace" (if words were people, it would be a nephew or niece rather than a son or daughter.)

    b

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