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    #1

    meaning of haveing fits

    Dear Teachers,

    I read this from The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody by Will Cuppy:

    "Caesar was bald when he knew Cleopatra. He also had fits. Among his achievements may be mentioned a book about his massacres in Gaul and the total destruction of the Alexandrian library."

    1. Does "fit" here mean epilepsy?
    2. "A book" makes me pretty confused. Is it saying that "his achievements that may be written about in a book include his massacres in Gaul"?

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: meaning of haveing fits

    Quote Originally Posted by Eway View Post
    Dear Teachers,

    I read this from The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody by Will Cuppy:

    "Caesar was bald when he knew Cleopatra. He also had fits. Among his achievements may be mentioned a book about his massacres in Gaul and the total destruction of the Alexandrian library."

    1. Does "fit" here mean epilepsy?
    2. "A book" makes me pretty confused. Is it saying that "his achievements that may be written about in a book include his massacres in Gaul"?
    As far as can be judged from contemporary observations, his seizures seem to have been epileptic.

    His achievements included not only doing those things but also writing about them - in, for example, De Bello Gallico.

    b

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    #3

    Re: meaning of haveing fits

    Quote Originally Posted by Eway View Post
    Dear Teachers,

    I read this from The Decline and Fall of Practically Everybody by Will Cuppy:

    "Caesar was bald when he knew Cleopatra. He also had fits. Among his achievements may be mentioned a book about his massacres in Gaul and the total destruction of the Alexandrian library."

    1. Does "fit" here mean epilepsy?
    2. "A book" makes me pretty confused. Is it saying that "his achievements that may be written about in a book include his massacres in Gaul"?

    Not a teacher.

    In this case, yes, it means epilepsy. Calling it "fits" is not really acceptable today. Seizures may be used instead.

    Fit in a modern sense also means if someone has the tendency to become very angry, (s)he is said to have "fits of anger."
    Fit can also mean very frustrated. e.g. I was fit to be tied because traffic was so congested, I knew that I would be late for work.

    The fact that Caesar was bald is because the Roman men of the time removed all body hair.

    I have no opinion/information about the book.

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