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  1. #1

    tuck = drop or fold?

    I waver between A and D in the following multiple-choice question, which requires to find the word closest in meaning to the underlined word
    The young boy tucked the coin into his pocket.
    A.Dropped B.grabbed C.opened D.folded
    My teacher said the answer was D but I think folding coins is impossible. If it were paper-money in the sentence, I would choose D. So I would rather choose A.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: tuck = drop or fold?

    This is a difficult one. It's true that you can't fold coins but on the other hand folding as an action is much closer to tucking than it is to dropping.

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    #3

    Re: tuck = drop or fold?

    If I have the coin in my hand, and then place my hand into my pocket, release the coin, it is dropped. Folding certainly doesn't make any sense.

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    #4

    Re: tuck = drop or fold?

    Hello,
    Not a teacher;

    The young boy tucked the coin into his pocket.

    I wouldn't looked just at the world but also consider the preposition. I'd check out that:

    tuck in/into
    fold in/into

    Cheers

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    #5

    Re: tuck = drop or fold?

    Quote Originally Posted by linhtho0211 View Post
    I waver between A and D in the following multiple-choice question, which requires to find the word closest in meaning to the underlined word
    The young boy tucked the coin into his pocket.
    A.Dropped B.grabbed C.opened D.folded
    My teacher said the answer was D but I think folding coins is impossible. If it were paper-money in the sentence, I would choose D. So I would rather choose A.
    He could tuck a bank-note (or a handkerchief, or anything foldable) into his pocket, but not a coin. B and C are obviously wrong; which leaves only A.

    b

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    #6

    Re: tuck = drop or fold?

    Hello,
    Not a teacher.

    hmmm ok I did some research.
    That are google results for "tucked * into * pocket"
    Among many foldable things there are also :

    1. a few pieces of the fruit
    2. the teeth
    3. slender vest-pocket pencil
    4. a camera
    5. .38 revolver

    and the BNC list for [=tuck] into

    Although most of the usage of fold smth into is used when talk about cooking.

    Cheers,

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: tuck = drop or fold?

    That usage (fold into) has a special sense (applying only to cookery). It means 'mix in either very gently or not very thoroughly or both': To make meringues, separate the yolks from 4 large eggs. Beat the whites thoroughly, until the mixture forms stiff peaks. Then fold in the beaten yolks.

    But you're right about folding. What I had in mind when I said 'foldable' was that foldable things can often peek out of a pocket - and the important thing is that something tucked into a pocket has to be visible from the outside. You can tuck a banana into your pocket, but not a tangerine; that (being visibly in the pocket) accounts for 3, 4, and 5 (and 1 - as it was a few pieces). 2 is very odd; I'll have to check the context. Perhaps it's a set of false teeth that doesn't fit easily into the pocket.

    Thanks for 'keeping me honest'

    b

    PS Beware of those 24 hits for 'tuck into' - several of them could be instances of the phrasal verb 'tuck in' which means 'eat [enthusiastically]': After his two weeks of bread and water, he tucked in to the stew.
    Last edited by BobK; 17-Jan-2009 at 20:24. Reason: Added PS

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    #8

    Re: tuck = drop or fold?

    I seem to have some memory from history studies, that a pocket was originally an external thing, possibly foldable. Of course we don't have a context for this sentence but maybe it refers to something in the middle ages. What do you think?

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    #9

    Re: tuck = drop or fold?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I seem to have some memory from history studies, that a pocket was originally an external thing, possibly foldable. Of course we don't have a context for this sentence but maybe it refers to something in the middle ages. What do you think?

    Webster's dictionary defines it as a small bag-like item made of cloth sewn on or into an article, or also an opening, hole or crevasse such as in rocks. I think the discussion here is more about the folding, rather than the meaning of a pocket. A coin cannot be folded is my stand.

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