Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,860
    #1

    ''get through''

    I'm too fat. I can't get through.
    I'm afraid of getting through the door because of the big dog.
    The exam was very difficult. I don't think I'll get through.
    My id is not in order. I think the officer won't allow me to get through.


    Are these right ways of using this phrasal verb, please?
    Thanks

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 902
    #2

    Re: ''get through''

    Always use a dictionary (e.g., www.dictionary.com) but also always be careful.

    get through

    a. to succeed, as in meeting, reaching, or contacting by telephone (usually fol. by to): I tried to call you last night, but I couldn't get through.
    b. to complete; finish: How he ever got through college is a mystery.
    c. to make oneself understood: One simply cannot get through to her.

    go through

    a. To examine carefully: went through the students' papers.
    b. To experience: We went through hell while working on this project.
    c. To perform: I went through the sonata in 30 minutes.


    So:

    I'm too fat. I can't get through. <--- get through (a) (succeed in "going through", see below for the literal meaning)

    The exam was very difficult. I don't think I'll get through. <--get through (a); (b) is possible in The exam will probably be very difficult. I don't think I'll get through all the questions.

    None of the idiomatic meanings of "go through" apply for the other two sentences, but the literal meaning, to go in, pass through, and come out, fits well. On the other hand, "get through" is purely an idiom, and none of its meanings fit:

    I'm afraid of going through the door because of the big dog.

    My ID is not in order. I think the officer won't allow me to go through.

    By the way, look up "id" to see why ID=identification should be capitalized.
    Last edited by abaka; 18-Jan-2009 at 01:24.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,860
    #3

    Re: ''get through''

    Thanks a lot.

    I found many entries for ''get through the door'' on COCA and Google.

    Answers.com states the following:

    Succeed in passing or surviving something, as in This epidemic is awful, but I'm sure we'll get through it somehow. [Mid-1700s]

    The phrasal verb section of this forum says:

    Get through - Manage to pass
    The water GOT THROUGH the roof and damaged the carpets.


    I thought that, if the water ''gets through'' the roof, it was OK to use it the way I did. Actually, I just wanted to double check what I had already taken for granted.

    Thanks again.
    Last edited by jctgf; 18-Jan-2009 at 01:52.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 902
    #4

    Re: ''get through''

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    Thanks a lot.

    I found many entries for ''get through the door'' on COCA and Google.

    Answers.com states the following:

    Succeed in passing or surviving something, as in This epidemic is awful, but I'm sure we'll get through it somehow. [Mid-1700s]

    The phrasal verb section of this forum says:

    Get through - Manage to pass
    The water GOT THROUGH the roof and damaged the carpets.

    I thought that, if the water ''gets through'' the roof, it was OK to use it the way I did. Actually, I just wanted to double check what I had already taken for granted.

    Thanks again.
    Yes! As you've obviously figured out, "to get through the door" means "to succeed in going through the door." The clear idea is "to succeed by your own efforts", and that's why it's better to say "I think the officer won't allow me to go through". The choice is his; yours is the requirement to show ID.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •