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    #1

    of a brief interlude.. ?

    Kerensky has a place in history, of a brief interlude between despotisms.


    The bold-ed part is a prepositional phrase, right?

    If so, what is it modifying in the sentence?

    Thanks in advance for your response,
    Kiran

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    #2

    Re: of a brief interlude.. ?

    It is modifying the nominal phrase "place in history". What kind of place in history? That of an interlude between despotisms.

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    #3

    Re: of a brief interlude.. ?

    I still didn't get it.. :(

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    #4

    Re: of a brief interlude.. ?

    "To have a place in history" means to be remembered. And "place in history" is also the thing for which the subject is remembered.

    A good place in history. A bad place in history. His place in history was good. Kerensky's place in history was that of... This last one is about to say just what he was, or what he did: what we remember him for.

    And we remember Kerensky because his months in power were a brief interval = an interlude of "freedom" between the "despotic" tsarist and the communist regimes = despotisms.

    So: Kerensky -- or more precisely, the short period when Kerensky was the Russian prime minister -- has a place in history, that of a brief interlude between two despotisms.

    To repeat briefly: Kerensky's months in power were a brief interlude between two despotisms. Kerensky is remembered exactly for that. Therefore: Kerensky has a place in history, that of a brief interlude between two despotisms.

    PS. Only if I've managed to explain it well this time, let me add. If you look up "interlude" here, item 2, its original meaning, may be useful.

    PPS. Grammatically: "of a brief interlude between two despotisms" is an adjectival phrase, modifying the pronoun "that"; and "that" is in apposition to the direct object noun phrase "a place in history".
    Last edited by abaka; 20-Jan-2009 at 21:27. Reason: added postscript

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    #5

    Re: of a brief interlude.. ?

    I got it to an extent.. but trying to assimilate it totally:) That was a very patient and diligent reply, i feel. Thanks so much..

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    #6

    Re: of a brief interlude.. ?

    Obviously, I tried too hard. Please allow me one more attempt:

    Kerensky's months in power have a place in history, that of a brief interlude between two despotisms.

    This writer's style is perhaps flawed. He confuses, unconsciously or deliberately, "Kerensky" with "Kerensky's reign."

    I'm still not sure whether you wanted an analysis of grammar or an explanation of meaning, but I hope I've helped.
    Last edited by abaka; 21-Jan-2009 at 22:43. Reason: Underlined "interlude" and bolded "place", "that", to show the equivalences.

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    #7

    Re: of a brief interlude.. ?

    Quote Originally Posted by abaka View Post
    Obviously, I tried too hard. Please allow me (for) one more attempt: Is for missing here?

    Kerensky's months in power have a place in history, that of a brief interlude between two despotisms.

    This writer's style is perhaps flawed. He confuses, unconsciously or deliberately, "Kerensky" with "Kerensky's reign."

    I'm still not sure whether you wanted an analysis of grammar or an explanation of meaning, but I hope I've helped.
    Initially before started reading this post, I was concerned whether I would be capable enough to understand this. But eventually, I understood it. I always wanted an analysis of grammar, not of meaning..

    Now i have one more challenge.. that is to use that kind of modifiers in my written and spoken English..

    Thank you Abaka

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