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    #1

    declare surrender or declare surrendering

    Dear teacher,

    Please help me check these:

    1) President of X government Peter declared unconditional surrendering
    or:
    President of X government Peter declared unconditional surrender.
    Which one is right?

    2) Facing with failures to be clearly, he hastily declared to abdicade in favour of Mr. Y
    This sentence is right or not? (I'm not sure the underlined words)

    3) Our military forces attacked strongly making enemy too much confused and gradually broken up
    This sentence is right or not? (I'm not sure the underlined words)

    Thank you very much for your support.

    Phoenix

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    #2

    Re: declare surrender or declare surrendering

    Quote Originally Posted by phoenixqn81 View Post
    Dear teacher,

    Please help me check these:

    1) President of X government Peter declared unconditional surrendering
    or:
    President of X government Peter declared unconditional surrender.
    Which one is right?

    2) Facing with failures to be clearly, he hastily declared to abdicade in favour of Mr. Y
    This sentence is right or not? (I'm not sure the underlined words)

    3) Our military forces attacked strongly making enemy too much confused and gradually broken up
    This sentence is right or not? (I'm not sure the underlined words)

    Thank you very much for your support.

    Phoenix
    1) "declared unconditional surrender" or "surrendered unconditionally" [shorter is better]

    2) Facing total failure, he hastily declared his abdication/abdicated in favour of Mr. Y [shorter is better]

    3) Our military forces attacked strongly, confusing and eventually scattering the enemy.

    Note. If the attack is only by land, say "our army" or "our troops"; by sea, "our navy"; by air, "our air force". "Military forces" or just "military" is better saved for multi-phased warfare.
    Last edited by abaka; 20-Jan-2009 at 05:43. Reason: rm a couple of typos

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    #3

    Re: declare surrender or declare surrendering

    Thank abaka,

    I still have some query.

    1) At sentence 2 (Facing with failures to be clearly, he hastily declared to abdicade in favour of Mr. Y), I want to say that this man at that time hadn't met the failures yet. He'd just enthroned but he saw clearly the hard situation for him, so he abdicated.
    If I use "Facing with failures to be clearly", where's it wrong (about the grammer & meaning)?
    Do we just use "Facing some thing", not "Facing with some thing"? Do we have the phrase "face with" with some meaning?
    And I wonder if we can use "Facing failure which seeing clearly"

    2) Sentence 3, may I add a comma before making : "Our military forces attacked strongly, making enemy too much confused and gradually broken up". Then is it ok?

    3) And is this sentence right or wrong?:
    Many left weapons, mingled with disorderly crowd evacuating, and tried to exit from war region about to happen

    Thanks again

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    #4

    Re: declare surrender or declare surrendering

    Quote Originally Posted by phoenixqn81 View Post
    Thank abaka,

    I still have some query.

    1) At sentence 2 (Facing with failures to be clearly, he hastily declared to abdicade in favour of Mr. Y), I want to say that this man at that time hadn't met the failures yet. He'd just enthroned but he saw clearly the hard situation for him, so he abdicated.
    If I use "Facing with failures to be clearly", where's it wrong (about the grammer & meaning)?
    Do we just use "Facing some thing", not "Facing with some thing"? Do we have the phrase "face with" with some meaning?
    And I wonder if we can use "Facing failure which seeing clearly
    I apologize for the length of what I'm going to say.

    1) No, not facing. The idiom is "In the face of"
    In the face of clear danger, .... <-- note the comma. Also singular danger as a collective for all the different types of danger.
    a. he hastily decided to abdicate in favour of Mr. Y. <--- made up his mind; no more
    b. he hastily declared his intention to abdicate in favour of Mr. Y. <--- announced he would do it; no more
    c. he hastily abdicated in favour of Mr. Y. <--- he actually did it
    These are the three meaningful options I can see here, expressed idiomatically. The choice obviously depends on what you want to say.

    2) Sentence 3, may I add a comma before making : "Our military forces attacked strongly, making enemy too much confused and gradually broken up". Then is it ok?
    There should be a comma, but the problem is that neither "making enemy too much confused" nor "gradually broken up" is idiomatic, although it's grammatically perfect. The key point is that English likes active verbs whenever possible.

    making the enemy confused = confusing the enemy
    The "too much" is implied if you then say or imply the enemy was defeated.

    making enemy broken up = "breaking up the enemy". Unfortunately, this is not too precise. Do you mean "scattering the enemy"? <-- the enemy forces were broken up into smaller and disfunctional pieces. Let me know if I've misunderstood.
    So:

    Our military forces attacked strongly, confusing and gradually scattering the enemy.
    OR
    Our military forces attacked strongly, confusing and gradually breaking up the enemy.

    3) And is this sentence right or wrong?:
    Many left weapons, mingled with disorderly crowd evacuating, and tried to exit from war region about to happen
    This is much better. Is it the next sentence after #2? Slight revision for idiom:

    Many abandoned their weapons, mingled with the disorderly crowds of evacuees, and tried to escape from....
    or
    Many left their weapons, mingled with the disorderly crowds that were evacuating, and tried to flee....

    war region: war zone
    about to happen: incipient

    ... the incipient war zone.
    OR
    ... the war zone that was about to happen.

    Note. The "NOUN about to VERB" construction is rare in English. If you cannot find an adjective to replace "about to VERB", make it into a relative clause, as I did above.
    Last edited by abaka; 20-Jan-2009 at 09:22. Reason: revised for content

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: declare surrender or declare surrendering

    Additionally:
    Avoid phrases like too much confused. (Is a little confusion a good thing?)

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    #6

    Re: declare surrender or declare surrendering

    Yes, your idea in #2 is right with mine: the enemy forces were broken up into smaller and disfunctional pieces. Sentence 3 is likely after #2, so I will write: Many left weapons, mingled with disorderly crowd evacuating, and tried to exit from a region about to be conquered. is it right?

    And I still want to ask you again about "face with":
    Can I use "Facing with powerful attack of liberation army...",
    or I must use "In the face of powerful attack of liberation army..." (pls don't be troubled!)

    And by the way, I meet another problem:

    "morning on April 30th" or "in the morning of April 30th" is right?

    When we use "on the morning" and when we use "in the morning"?. You know, I just use "in the morning" up till now, so I'm very surprised when I see "on the morning" in the internet. Please help me.

    Thank you indeed.

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    #7

    Re: declare surrender or declare surrendering

    "morning on April 30th" or "in the morning of April 30th" is right?

    On April 30th in the morning. or On the morning of April 30th.

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: declare surrender or declare surrendering

    Simpler is usually better. Say:
    He surrendered.
    He abdicated....

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    #9

    Re: declare surrender or declare surrendering

    After giving it some thought, I rewrote my previous answer, and gave corrected alternatives that are closer to what you wrote originally. I see you took my erased suggestion with "region about to be conquered". That's the version I liked most, but later I wasn't sure how much you wanted me to attack the logic.

    And I still want to ask you again about "face with":
    Can I use "Facing with powerful attack of liberation army...",
    or I must use "In the face of powerful attack of liberation army..."
    Really, you could say any of the following:

    Faced with a powerful attack
    Facing a powerful attack
    In the face of a powerful attack

    First, note that every construction requires a noun.

    "Facing" and "faced with" are almost equivalent, and are used when the subject is anticipating something quite concrete (like an attack).

    "In the face of" is more abstract: "in the face of clear danger". Therefore I wouldn't use it with "a powerful attack". So:

    Facing a powerful attack by/of the Liberation Army
    Faced with a powerful attack by/of the Liberation Army <-- Here I'm guessing the army is the Chinese one.

    Note that Red Army (USSR), People's Liberation Army (China), etc., are capitalized.

    "morning on April 30th" or "in the morning of April 30th" is right?
    When we use "on the morning" and when we use "in the morning"?. You know, I just use "in the morning" up till now, so I'm very surprised when I see "on the morning" in the internet. Please help me.
    "The morning of April 30th" is the time period that day.
    "on the morning of April 30th", with a date, is when something happens.

    The army attacked on the morning of April 30.

    "in the morning", usually without a date, is something that you do, once or habitually.

    I always say hello to everyone in the morning.
    I'll call you in the morning. <-- this coming morning. see below.

    "Every morning" or "In the mornings" (literary and always at the beginning) is something that you do habitually:

    He would read her letter every morning.
    Every morning he would read her letter.

    In the mornings he would read her letter.


    "This morning" or "that morning" is something you do once:

    I'll call you this morning.
    April 30. That morning the army attacked.

    Thank you indeed.
    I only hope I've helped!
    Last edited by abaka; 21-Jan-2009 at 03:57. Reason: added a couple of examples.

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    #10

    Re: declare surrender or declare surrendering

    About the war zone. I would say it is a war zone. Perhaps:
    The soldiers mingled with the refugees escaping the war zone.

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