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    #1

    insufficient disclosure

    Please clarify the following phrases that are in bold.

    1. In 2005 United Business Media saw 87.2% of voting shareholders decide not to back a $500,000 'golden goodbye' to Lord Hollick..... and 58.1% of Pendragon shareholders withdrew their support for changes to executive bonuses which they seemed to have insufficient disclosure.

    Especially I'm confused about the meaning of "disclosure" in the context.

    2. Another requirement for strategic success is that every part of the organization must know where it fits in to this strategy and the part it is playing.

    Please explain the above in bold in easy English. And what does the two "it" refer to?

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: insufficient disclosure

    Quote Originally Posted by unpakwon View Post
    Please clarify the following phrases that are in bold.

    1. In 2005 United Business Media saw 87.2% of voting shareholders decide not to back a $500,000 'golden goodbye' to Lord Hollick..... and 58.1% of Pendragon shareholders withdrew their support for changes to executive bonuses which they deemed to have insufficient disclosure.

    Especially I'm confused about the meaning of "disclosure" in the context.
    First, I'd guess there's a typo. Even that doesn't make the rest of the sentence clear though. I think it's a really loose and confusing use of the verb 'have': they thought that information about executive bonuses was too hard to get hod of - that executives were insufficiently accountable.

    Quote Originally Posted by unpakwon View Post
    2. Another requirement for strategic success is that every part of the organization must know where it fits in to this strategy and the part it is playing.

    Please explain the above in bold in easy English. And what does the two "it" refer to?

    Thank you.
    The second 'it' refers to the first part - I've rewritten with this meaning in green. (There's a case to be made for the second 'it' referring to 'strategy' - I've rewritten with this meaning in pink. I think this is less likely, but possible.)

    Another requirement for strategic success is that every part of the organization must know the part it is playing, as well as where it fits in to this strategy.

    Another requirement for strategic success is that every part of the organization must know where it fits into this strategy, and the part that the strategy is playing in its work.

    I wish people (especially the ones who say things like 'business strategy') wouldn't do this - just have a thought and vaguely throw words at it in the hope that someone will get the gist.

    b

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    #3

    Re: insufficient disclosure

    PS Rather than that typo ('deemed') the idea might have just got 'derailed':

    '58.1% of Pendragon shareholders withdrew their support for changes to executive bonuses which seemed to them to provide insufficient mechanisms for disclosure.'

    b

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    #4

    Re: insufficient disclosure

    2. Another requirement for strategic success is that every part of the organization must know where it fits in to this strategy and the part it is playing.

    I am not a teacher.

    I think the it refers to every part of the organization.

    If a company's strategy is to enter the European market, for example, then the legal department must know the laws of import/export, the technical department must know the different requirements of the market of a particular company or product, and the sales department must know the sales of similar items in Europe. In other words, each department must know how it fits into the overall strategy to make an effective plan.

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    #5

    Re: insufficient disclosure

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    PS Rather than that typo ('deemed') the idea might have just got 'derailed':

    '58.1% of Pendragon shareholders withdrew their support for changes to executive bonuses which seemed to them to provide insufficient mechanisms for disclosure.'

    b

    I'm sorry I forgot to mention the typo at first.

    As you pointed out, "deemed", not "seemed", was correct.

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    #6

    Re: insufficient disclosure

    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi unpakwon,

    Herewith I would make an attempt to give you an explanation concerning the meaning of the term “disclosure” in the present context.

    Especially I'm confused about the meaning of "disclosure" in the context.”

    disclosure = 1) the supplying by a bank of information about a customer’s accounts, to any outside organization such as the Inland Revenue or the police. Banks have the right to refuse to disclosure such information except where ordered to do so by a court or low. 2) the duty of a company director to make known to other directors details of any interest he may have in a contract in which his company is connected.

    By the same token I would make an attempt to stand in with your masterly usage of the verb “have” in the expression in bold in your original post.
    First, I'd guess there's a typo. Even that doesn't make the rest of the sentence clear though. I think it's a really loose and confusing use of the verb 'have': “ (this was a rash and incorrect statement)

    There is a brief excerpt from an article (please see the link below) that will reassure you that you have properly used the verb in question, namely “have”as well as the verb “deem”.

    Perfomance-Pay Disclosure: Is the Honeymoon Over? - Compliance - CFO.com

    Whether the SEC will get more aggressive about enforcing its new Compensation, Disclosure & Analysis rules is still unclear. The commission has acknowledged that it considered last year a learning-curve period. But it also said it expected companies to make the required disclosures starting this year. To show the corporate community it was serious, last October the SEC sent letters to 350 companies it deemed to have provided insufficient disclosure.

    v., deemed, deem·ing, deems.
    v.tr.

    1. To have as an opinion; judge: deemed it was time for a change.
    2. To regard as; consider: deemed the results unsatisfactory.

    To deem is to consider something as having certain characteristics. If an act is deemed a crime by law, then it is held to be a crime. If someone is deemed liable for damages, then he or she will have to pay them.

    There is a further example.

    Even seemingly safe money funds have insufficient disclosure.

    Regards,

    V.

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    #7

    Re: insufficient disclosure

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi unpakwon,

    Herewith I would make an attempt to give you an explanation concerning the meaning of the term “disclosure” in the present context.

    Especially I'm confused about the meaning of "disclosure" in the context.”

    disclosure = 1) the supplying by a bank of information about a customer’s accounts, to any outside organization such as the Inland Revenue or the police. Banks have the right to refuse to disclosure such information except where ordered to do so by a court or low. 2) the duty of a company director to make known to other directors details of any interest he may have in a contract in which his company is connected.

    By the same token I would make an attempt to stand in with your masterly usage of the verb “have” in the expression in bold in your original post.
    First, I'd guess there's a typo. Even that doesn't make the rest of the sentence clear though. I think it's a really loose and confusing use of the verb 'have': “ (this was a rash and incorrect statement)

    There is a brief excerpt from an article (please see the link below) that will reassure you that you have properly used the verb in question, namely “have”as well as the verb “deem”.

    Perfomance-Pay Disclosure: Is the Honeymoon Over? - Compliance - CFO.com

    Whether the SEC will get more aggressive about enforcing its new Compensation, Disclosure & Analysis rules is still unclear. The commission has acknowledged that it considered last year a learning-curve period. But it also said it expected companies to make the required disclosures starting this year. To show the corporate community it was serious, last October the SEC sent letters to 350 companies it deemed to have provided insufficient disclosure.

    v., deemed, deem·ing, deems.
    v.tr.

    1. To have as an opinion; judge: deemed it was time for a change.
    2. To regard as; consider: deemed the results unsatisfactory.

    To deem is to consider something as having certain characteristics. If an act is deemed a crime by law, then it is held to be a crime. If someone is deemed liable for damages, then he or she will have to pay them.

    There is a further example.

    Even seemingly safe money funds have insufficient disclosure.

    Regards,

    V.
    I'm afraid you're wrong. Learn and be quiet. Copious quoting from mistaken internet sources is no justification for error. It just wastes people's time and encourages the dissemination of misinformation.

    'disclosure = 1) the supplying by a bank of information about a customer’s accounts...'
    What this use of 'have' implies is the requirement to supply... This usage is 'loose and confusing'.

    Many of your posts are invitations to waste time correcting your multifarious errors. I shall not play the game any more.

    b

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