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  1. #1

    Brain-searing

    Hi! Could you please explain or/and give a synonymous expression for:

    brain-searing moment


    Thank you

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Brain-searing

    Do you have any context? I'd guess it was something negative - frightening or awful or terrifying.

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    #3

    Re: Brain-searing

    If it is used in a positive context, one of the synonymous expressions could be 'an engrossing moment'

    I am not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: Brain-searing

    Yes, it could be +ve or -ve. "Searing" is painful, but the pain could come from intense joy (or any other intense positive feeling).

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    #5

    Re: Brain-searing

    I have a small question here pertaining to the differences between either ... or and or.

    Bob, in the above sentence, instead of just or, I feel either.. or sounds more apt. Could you please light up this issue for me? Also please let me know the difference if there are any.

    Thanks.

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    #6

    Re: Brain-searing

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    I have a small question here pertaining to the differences between either ... or and or.

    Bob, in the above sentence, instead of just or, I feel either.. or sounds more apt. Could you please light up this issue for me? Also please let me know the difference if there are any.

    Thanks.
    I'm afraid I don't understand the question, but I'll try to answer the question I think you're asking.

    The two ('either...or' and 'or) can be effectively synonymous, but the different wordings can be used to distinguish an exclusive 'or' (A_and_not_B, or B_and_not_A) from an inclusive 'or' (either or both). In rhetoric and technical writing (especially when writing instructions) it's clearer to use
    'either ... or' if you're talking about an exclusive 'or'.

    If this doesn't answer your question (and it really belonged in a new thread if it does ), please re-word it and give examples.

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    #7

    Re: Brain-searing

    You addressed my question.. :) So the question doesn't really need a new thread to be evoked.. :D

    But I still have some traces of doubt left from your explanation.

    Each of the things (either or both) is inclusive. A normal 'or' is exclusive. Did I understand well? or again, Did I falter?:(

    Thanks,
    Kiran

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    #8

    Re: Brain-searing

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    You addressed my question.. :) So the question doesn't really need a new thread to be evoked.. :D

    But I still have some traces of doubt left from your explanation.

    Each of the things (either or both) is inclusive. A normal 'or' is exclusive. Did I understand well? or again, Did I falter?:(

    Thanks,
    Kiran
    The difference is between OR and XOR. This difference exists in logic but is not always made clear in English.

    Read more here: Exclusive or - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    #9

    Re: Brain-searing

    Afterthought re 'brain-searing':

    There are several other idioms that refer to something actually physically happening to the brain or the mind:

    • When you try hard to remember something you rack or cudgel your brain
    • 'mind-numbing' = very boring: 'I've got a lecture with Prof. Rickard this morning./What's he like?/Mind-numbing. I'd rather watch paint dry.'
    • When something changes your whole way of thinking it 'blows your mind'
    • ...[there must be more]


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