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    #1

    My spoken english' confusions - II

    Hi all,
    Please help me on my following 3rd set of confusions:
    what are the differences among 'I'd rather watch paint dry' , 'I'd rather watch paint to dry' and 'I'd rather watch paint to get dried'?
    Is 'to call upon' same as 'to call forth'?
    The one movie I want to the see the most is 'Arundhati' which i want to see because we, our family, want to go. Is the fitting of the conjunction which with the following clause ok?
    Spicejet, due to poor services, (evokes)/(invokes) annoyance (out of) / (from) the customers. Which option is correct in each of the two cases?
    Now, many things are there to contemplate (upon)/(on).
    Thanks a lot,
    Kiran

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    #2

    Re: My spoken english' confusions - II

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    Hi all,
    what are the differences among 'I'd rather watch paint dry' , 'I'd rather watch paint to dry' and 'I'd rather watch paint to get dried'?
    The idiom is to watch paint dry. The passive generally goes against the active spirit of the language, and the "watch to do" is not used at all.

    Is 'to call upon' same as 'to call forth'?
    In the sense "to summon someone to do something", yes, although in NAmE "call upon" is much more common than "call forth".

    The one movie I want to the see the most is 'Arundhati' which i want to see because we, our family, want to go. Is the fitting of the conjunction which with the following clause ok?
    Grammatically, yes, if preceded by a comma. But why so many words? The one movie I want to see the most is "Arundhati"; our whole family wants to go.

    Spicejet, due to poor services, (evokes)/(invokes) annoyance (out of) / (from) the customers. Which option is correct in each of the two cases?
    Now, many things are there to contemplate (upon)/(on).
    "Service" is an abstract noun. Do not make plural. "its/their poor service".

    I think you want "provokes". Annoyance "in" the customers.
    "Evoke" is very passive in its action, and is generally positive: The dreamy landscape evokes a yearning for the romantic days of youth.
    "To invoke" is wrong here: meaning 7 is just not used in this context.

    Now, many things are there to contemplate (upon)/(on).
    Upon, but it's optional.
    Last edited by abaka; 26-Jan-2009 at 17:57. Reason: typos

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    #3

    Re: My spoken english' confusions - II

    thanks Abaka.. :)

    How is annoyance in differ from either annoyance from or annoyance out of?

    I often get confused when it comes to fitting of prepositions.. :(

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    #4

    Re: My spoken english' confusions - II

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    thanks Abaka.. :)

    How is annoyance in differ from either annoyance from or annoyance out of?

    I often get confused when it comes to fitting of prepositions.. :(
    The idiom is to provoke what in whom.

    Prepositions are maddening. They are very difficult to explain by logic alone. . Keep one thing in mind: English is a language of verbs. Learn and keep using active phrases like the one above, where the verb goes with the preposition, and you'll do very well.

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    #5

    Re: My spoken english' confusions - II

    One more sentence( this time it is a conditional one):

    I have tried a lot of times calling him. Let me know if you got/get through.

    I feel the verb should be get, not got. Am I right?

    Thanks

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