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    #1

    Preposition and Ajective doubts

    I carried her the/to/through rest of the way. There were few moments in those days when were not worrying about money. Very few and very wonderful – and that moment one of them.


    Kindly explain why option for the first one is wrong? I choose through. why the is correct? I feel the preposition through is missing if the is the right option./ :(

    Doubt #2: I looked at the old house with its tall/high stone walls and narrow windows. I chose tall and it was wrong, why?

    Thanks,
    Kiran
    Last edited by kiranlegend; 01-Feb-2009 at 18:39.

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    #2

    Re: Preposition and Ajective doubts

    I carried her the/to/through rest of the way. There were few moments in those days when we were not worrying about money. Very few and very wonderful – and that moment was? one of them.

    The relevant phrases, with "to" and "through", are:

    1. to carry something to <destination: person, place, thing>
    2. to carry something through <medium: surrounding objects, conditions, influences, environment>
    3. to carry <a task> through. [ to complete the task ].

    --3. Is "she" a task? Let's say yes. Then what is rest? Noun or verb? Can't be a verb. [why not?] So it's a noun. But where's the article? Missing. So it doesn't work.

    --2. Does "rest of the way" sound like a destination? NO.

    --1. Does "rest of the way" sound like a medium? Well, NO, not directly. But let's say YES. Then we have the same problem with "rest of the way" as above.

    ----------------------

    With "the" we have a nice noun phrase we can use as an adverb of manner: the rest of the way.

    That's the answer.

    I carried her the rest of the way.

    --------------------------

    As a general rule, living things are "tall", and non-living things are "high". There are of course many figurative exceptions, but here the words "tall" and "high" carry no figurative meaning.

    PS. Perhaps my high/tall distinction is not very good. Things stand tall: people, buildings, ships; and things are high (walls, grades, mountains, ceilings). One way to think of it, perhaps, is to imagine a person standing: he has height, but not so much width or depth, comparatively speaking.
    Last edited by abaka; 02-Feb-2009 at 07:58. Reason: modified high/tall (postscript)

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