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    #1

    "loyalties above the law"

    I can't understand this phrase, anyone please explain this to me, thanks very much!!!!!!
    You can find the phrase in here.
    Mateship - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    #2

    Re: "loyalties above the law"

    "Loyalties over the law", right? Well, the preposition makes no difference.

    It means a loyalty held more deeply than the loyalty to uphold the law.

    As the Wikipedia article says, "mateship" is the Austrailan term for being loyal to your friends regardless of anything else. If a judge exhibits "mateship" to a participant in a case, on the other hand, he is by definition corrupt: he has not been impartial; he has betrayed his oath to uphold the law at all times; he has put his loyalty to his friend above his loyalty to the law. Mateship can therefore be "a loyalty above or over the law."

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    #3

    Re: "loyalties above the law"

    Thanks, what you said has confirmed my understanding of the phrase.
    Really helpful indeed.

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