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    #1

    Punctuation

    Hello,

    #1 What is the meaning of the sentence:

    I was feeling 'down'.

    Why the quotation marks?

    #2 When the film was over, we stayed in the seats(,) watching the final credits.

    Do we have to use the comma before watching? Is it volitional? Does ommitting change the meaning?

    Thanks for help.

    Waawe

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    #2

    Re: Punctuation

    Hello Waawe,

    #1 I don't know why the writer chose to emphasize the word down here: I was feeling 'down'. What's the context?

    #2 No comma required here: we stayed in the seats watching the final credits.

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    #3

    Re: Punctuation

    Thanks for your answer, Soup.

    Ad 1: there is no context provided. Its part of a punctuation exercise where LL are supposed to explain the meaning. Could the inverted commas here suggest some irony?


    There is another sentence of which I cant make head nor tail:

    They said it was marvellous.
    They said it was marvellous.

    What is the difference between them? Is it common in written English to use the underscore? How does it change the meaning?

    Thank you.

    Waawe

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    #4

    Re: Punctuation

    "Down" meaning "depressed" is very colloquial, so I suspect the writer chose to make a display of erudition, by quoting those ignorant people who say it without knowing the more literary term.

    The underscore or italics emphasize something, in order to contrast it with what is left unsaid and must be determined in context.

    They said it was marvellous. - but perhaps thought it was awful.

    They said it was marvellous. - but we think it's awful.

    Such stress is very common and proper in conversation, but fairly rare in writing. When it is a favourite device of the author, for example of Lewis Carroll, or of Queen Victoria in her letters and diaries, it stands out and can become annoying.

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