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    #1

    As such

    Where I live, it is common to use 'As such' to mean 'Therefore'. But according to what I have read in an English usage book, this is not correct.

    He is fat. As such he cannot run fast. (This is one example of the phrase used wrongly.)

    The phrase is correctly used if 'As such' refers back to the subject.

    She is the principal of the school. As such, she has the authority to cane students who have committed serious offences in the school. ('As such' refers back to the principal.)

    I wonder whether native speakers are in agreement with this rule.

    Many thanks.

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    #2

    Re: As such

    It should refer to something, but be careful to not assume it is always a person.

    Skiing is fun. As such, it is a great family activity.

    "as such" is somewhat old fashion.

    Skiing is fun, so it is a great family activity.
    Skiing is fun, therefore, it is a great family activity.

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    #3

    Re: As such

    May I add? "such" used by itself a pronoun. As such, it stands for a noun (or possibly another pronoun).

    Therefore "He is fat. As such, he cannot run fast" is poor, because the pronoun stands for an adjective. And "He is fat. As such"... is meaningless, because then all males are slow.

    "He is a fat boy. As such, he cannot..." is acceptable, because the pronoun stands for a noun (phrase).

    "She is principal. As such, she...." is also acceptable.

    I agree with Susiedqq. The construction is a little old-fashioned, or in any case rather formal.
    Last edited by abaka; 04-Feb-2009 at 21:26. Reason: wording.

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    #4

    Re: As such

    Hi Abaka

    "He is a fat boy. As such, he cannot..." is acceptable, because the pronoun stands for a noun (phrase).

    I don't understand why the above is correct. What words should be added to 'cannot' to complete the sentence and the make the use of 'As such' correct?

    Many thanks.

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    #5

    Re: As such

    "Fat" is an adjective; "fat boy" is a noun phrase (adjective + noun). In this case, what had to be added is the noun "boy". The bold in my other post shows the equivalence between "such" and whatever it stands for.

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    #6

    Re: As such

    Thanks, Abaka.

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