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    • Join Date: Jan 2009
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    #1

    still haven't

    Dear teacher,
    If the grammatical way is to use "yet" in a negative sentence, why does that song from U2 say "I still haven't found what I'm looking for"?
    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: still haven't

    The "yet" is optional, but not necessary.

    Whatever transgressions against schoolbook grammar U2 may have allowed, that title is irreproachable.


    • Join Date: Jan 2009
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    #3

    Re: still haven't

    Is it common and natural English? Do people in the streets speak this way?
    Thank you so much.


    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #4

    Re: still haven't

    dear John,
    "Yet" in this sentence would mean "I think or I hope I will find it in the future" but this sentence means "the inability to find is still there";in other words, this sounds more desparate. I don't know what grammar book has laid down this stupid rule, but any grammar book worh its salt, like Micheal Swan's Practical English Usage or Geoffrey Leech's Communicative English Grammar can back up my opinion.
    Best wishes

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    #5

    Re: still haven't

    "I haven't found it" -- simple, no overtones.

    "I haven't found it yet" -- "Yet" adds that I hope to find it.
    "I still haven't found it" -- Equivalent to "yet": I hope to find it.

    "I still haven't found it yet" -- Pleonasm. Two words expressing the same idea. Not good.


    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #6

    Re: still haven't

    Quote Originally Posted by abaka View Post
    "I haven't found it" -- simple, no overtones.

    "I haven't found it yet" -- "Yet" adds that I hope to find it.
    "I still haven't found it" -- Equivalent to "yet": I hope to find it.
    A language must be mad to have two forms that are exactly the same. According to 'A Practical English Grammar' by Thomson & Martinet (p.56). and Practical English Usage by Michael Swan (second edition,p.563) this is not right.
    "I still haven't found it yet" -- Pleonasm. Two words expressing the same idea. Not good.
    .

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    #7

    Re: still haven't

    Dear Paul

    If our language were not mad, we should not discuss it without end.

    Sincerely,

    Alex


    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #8

    Re: still haven't

    Quote Originally Posted by abaka View Post
    Dear Paul

    If our language were not mad, we should not discuss it without end.

    Sincerely,

    Alex
    Dear Alex,
    I hope you didn't take it personally; I just quoted a semanticist- a teacher of mine who always advised us against using" always, never, the same" when discussing language- perhaps BECAUSE it is mad.
    very truly yours,
    paul

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    #9

    Re: still haven't

    ^ No, of course not. But our language IS mad.


    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #10

    Re: still haven't

    Quote Originally Posted by abaka View Post
    ^ No, of course not. But our language IS mad.
    couldn't agree more. Still, there is method in its madness!

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