Results 1 to 6 of 6

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 212
    #1

    run contra

    Dear Friends,

    I just wonder how I could use the expresion 'run contra' (meaning 'to contradict'):

    1. My theory runs contra XY's theory.
    2. My theory runs contra to XY's theory.

    Anyway, is 'run contra' used at all in English or is it only a matter of my creativity?

    Thank you for your ideas.

    Palinkasocsi
    Last edited by palinkasocsi; 08-Feb-2009 at 16:17.

  1. RonBee's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2003
    • Posts: 16,551
    #2

    Re: run contra

    Perhaps you are thinking of runs contrary to.



  2. IvanV's Avatar

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 576
    #3

    Re: run contra

    Quote Originally Posted by palinkasocsi View Post
    My theory runs contra XY's theory.
    Not common, but okay.
    contra, adj. - in opposition to something


    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 364
    #4

    Re: run contra

    Contra is a real word and you still sometimes see it. Its a Latin adverb and the root of words like 'contrary'.

    2. My theory runs contra to XY's theory

    If you wanted to maximize your audience you would avoid Latin terms.

    2) My theory is the opposite of XY's theory.

    Would be approximately equivalent.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 1,032
    #5

    Re: run contra

    I have heard it used, but it seemed to me that the person was trying to impress me and others in his command of English. It sounds very stiff to me. Contrary to is definitely much more common.

  3. IvanV's Avatar

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 576
    #6

    Re: run contra

    Quote Originally Posted by Searching for language View Post
    I have heard it used, but it seemed to me that the person was trying to impress me and others in his command of English. It sounds very stiff to me. Contrary to is definitely much more common.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •