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  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile approval and recommendation

    Please, dear teachers and friends...

    could you shed some light on this?

    I am trying to get used to the 'approval' and 'recommend' verbs and nouns usages/uses.

    a) That's the only person my parents have appoved of.
    b) Who do I need to talk to to/for approval(ing) of this document?
    c) How do I put(?) this document on approval?
    d) Do you think they will approval (of) my letters?

    e) I recommend (you, her, him) to/for buy(ing) new cloths(ing?).
    f) Follow my recommendations, otherwise you are dead.
    g) That's not the sort of person that I would recommend to/for this job.
    h) That's it. That's what I am talking about. What shall I do to recommend it to everyone on this floor?

    So, are they fine?

    Thank you very much.
    Last edited by Offroad; 09-Feb-2009 at 18:05. Reason: typo

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: approval and recommendation

    You're pretty close.

    If I approve OF something, I think it's a good idea. I have an opinion.

    If I approve something (no "of") it means I have the power/the responsibility to say "yes" or "no" to something.

    I need to get my brochures approved by my legal department before they are final. The lawyer can say "No, I can't approve this," and if so, we need to fix it before it can be used. On the other hand, sometimes my boss doesn't always approve of my choice of photos, but he won't say "You cannot use this" -- instead he says "I would prefer another choice."

    If I recommend something to you, I think it's a good choice FOR you (purpose).

    I recommend [that] you try Firefox.
    I recommended Firefox to my friend, but he's had only trouble with it. I wish now I hadn't recommended it.

    I recommended this restaurant to my friend. They loved it and said they would recommend it for a special night out.

    TO whom. FOR what (purpose).

  3. Offroad's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: approval and recommendation

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    If I approve OF something, I think it's a good idea. I have an opinion.

    If I approve something (no "of") it means I have the power/the responsibility to say "yes" or "no" to something.

    I honestly can't tell them apart. I think I am slow today.
    I could say:

    No, I can't approve OF this. Meaning I don't think it is a good idea.
    No, I can't approve this. Meaning I am saying NO.

    in both cases something or someone needs my approval, and I am saying no to them. Maybe, the first option (OF) sounds more polite. Not sure.

    I need to get my brochures approved by my legal department before they are final. The lawyer can say "No, I can't approve this," and if so, we need to fix it before it can be used. On the other hand, sometimes my boss doesn't always approve of my choice of photos, but he won't say "You cannot use this" -- instead he says "I would prefer another choice."
    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    If I recommend something to you, I think it's a good choice FOR you (purpose).

    I recommend [that] you try Firefox.

    I recommended Firefox to my friend, but he's had only trouble with it. I wish now I hadn't recommended it.

    I recommended this restaurant to my friend. They loved it and said they would recommend it for a special night out.


    TO whom. FOR what (purpose).

    I am almost sure we could say:

    I recommend you to try Firefox.
    I will recommend you to my boss.
    I will recommend you for this position.

    The green sentence still confuses me, could you shed some light on it?
    Thanks a million.
    Last edited by Offroad; 09-Feb-2009 at 20:23.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: approval and recommendation

    The green one doesn't work (in American English).
    I recommend [that] you try...
    I recommend such-and-such TO you.

    Okay, with "approve" and "approve of" --

    If you approve of something, you like it, you think it's a good idea.

    Are you familiar with the idea of a go/no go decision? Yes, it moves forward, or no it does not. That requires that someone approve it. You say "yes" to something.

    If I am your manager, and you want to request vacation, I have to approve the dates you want to take. You may tell me that you're going for for a week of wild sex with prostitues. I may not approve OF the way you're going to spend your time, but as your manager, if you have the vacation time available and no one else has asked for that time off, I will have to say yes to (i.e., approve) your request.

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