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    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #1

    Past v Passed

    I am continually confused by this - in speech most sounds like Past

    But is it - Time rushed past in Scotland.

    or - Time rushed passed in Scotland.

    --

    The humour past me by.

    or The humour passed me by

    Thanks

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    #2

    Re: Past v Passed

    'Passed' is a verb - the past form of pass - move past something, in a direction or to the other side of something, so you can pass something on your way.
    So, "the humor passed me by" is correct, in this sentence 'pass' is the verb.
    'Past' can be an adjective and a noun, as opposed to present. (Consider phrases like "in past ages", "past events" etc.)
    'Past' is also used as a preposition or an adverb, and this is what you need. It means something like after, further, to the other side of something. It gives information about a direction.
    This way, "time rushed past" is correct. "Rushed passed" would be illogical, since you'd have two verbs. However, you could say "rushed, passed", which is "rushed and passed".


    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #3

    Re: Past v Passed

    Thank you, meskete. Thought I was right, but sometimes the more one thinks, the worse it gets.

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    #4

    Re: Past v Passed

    Quote Originally Posted by meskete View Post
    'Passed' is a verb - the past form of pass - move past something, in a direction or to the other side of something, so you can pass something on your way.
    So, "the humor passed me by" is correct, in this sentence 'pass' is the verb.
    'Past' can be an adjective and a noun, as opposed to present. (Consider phrases like "in past ages", "past events" etc.)
    'Past' is also used as a preposition or an adverb, and this is what you need. It means something like after, further, to the other side of something. It gives information about a direction.
    This way, "time rushed past" is correct. "Rushed passed" would be illogical, since you'd have two verbs. However, you could say "rushed, passed", which is "rushed and passed".
    Dear meskete,

    Can the "passed by" be used as an adverb?

    The passed by ages...
    The passing by days.. etc.

    Thank you
    Darijus

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    #5

    Re: Past v Passed

    Quote Originally Posted by Darijus View Post
    Dear meskete,

    Can the "passed by" be used as an adverb?

    The passed by ages...
    The passing by days.. etc.

    Thank you
    Darijus
    Sorry, as an adjective in this case

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