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    #1

    Question to get round to

    Hello. I am following Abakaīs advise to read English authors and newspapers, and I have found a sentence whose meaning is not very clear for me.I am learning on phrasal verbs. When I looked for the usage of "to get round to" in context,I found this: When asked why he didn't turn in his own gun, Burris told members of the Tribune's editorial board: "I just didn't get around to doing it." Does it mean that Burris hadnīt handed over or deliver his gun because he didnīt have the time to do this? or that Burris hadnīt inform on having a gun to the Official Department because he didnīt have the time.
    Well, thanks. Actually, it is very difficult for a Spanish learner to deal with phrasals.

  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to get round to

    Quote Originally Posted by MARAMARA View Post
    Hello. I am following Abakaīs advise to read English authors and newspapers, and I have found a sentence whose meaning is not very clear for me.I am learning on phrasal verbs. When I looked for the usage of "to get round to" in context,I found this: When asked why he didn't turn in his own gun, Burris told members of the Tribune's editorial board: "I just didn't get around to doing it." Does it mean that Burris hadnīt handed over or deliver his gun because he didnīt have the time to do this? or that Burris hadnīt inform on having a gun to the Official Department because he didnīt have the time.
    Well, thanks. Actually, it is very difficult for a Spanish learner to deal with phrasals.
    Hi!

    I don't know what a phrasal is, so let me start with the basics:

    Notice first that the word is around, not round. (However, in conversation, sometimes people shorten around to 'round, with an apostrophe.)

    Around is a preposition, like over, under, on, and off. It can mean surrounding or near.

    The use you're asking about is an idiom. Getting around to something is like getting to something. It strongly implies that it could easily have been done if it had been more important to the person.

    She had all evening, but she never got around to her homework.

    A week later, he still hadn't gotten around to washing his hair.


    So the article is telling you that Burris did have time to turn in his gun, but neglected to it anyway - maybe because he's lazy, forgetful, or in love with his gun.

    [I edit copy and have tutored college writing.]


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    #3

    Unhappy Re: to get round to

    Thank you for the explanation.It is difficult for me to distinguish between an idiom and a phrasal verb (those that Iīve also seen named as "phrasals"). But, may I insist on TURN IN meaning?
    Iīve found it like a phrasal verb in Cambridge dictionary of phrasal verbs:
    to give something back to an organization or person in authority (entregar, en espaņol)
    and like an idiom in Answers page, with these two definitions:
    1. Hand in, give over, as in I turned in my exam and left the room. [c. 1300]
    2. Surrender or inform on, especially to the police, as in The shoplifter turned herself in. Also, To betray in other dictionary.
    I cannot find the best way to learn and remember phrasal verbs or idioms, except reading, like Abaka has said, and then trying to use them in sentences.
    Your opinion would be very important. Thanks.

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    #4

    Re: to get round to

    Practise saying them in your own sentences. When you find a new one in a book, movie, etc., make a note of it and try to use it. Have someone check your attempts.


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    #5

    Re: to get round to

    Disclaimer: I'm not a teacher. But I have a BA in linguistics (and soon an MA in applied linguistics) which hopefully counts for something.

    I don't think it's common to call a phrasal verb simply a "phrasal".

    "Get round to" is British English (and maybe found in other Commonwealth countries too). In the USA, we say "get around to". "Get (a)round to" is both a phrasal verb and an idiom. It is a phrasal verb because the verb and the following particles form a single unit of meaning. It is an idiom because its meaning is not just the sum of the individual words' meanings. Some phrasal verbs are not idiomatic, such as "switch on" in "He switched the light on" or "pull off" in "She pulled off her shoe." However, many phrasal verbs are idiomatic.

    "Turn in" is an idiomatic phrasal verb.

    I hope that helps some.

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    #6

    Re: to get round to

    Quote Originally Posted by particleman View Post
    Disclaimer: I'm not a teacher. But I have a BA in linguistics (and soon an MA in applied linguistics) which hopefully counts for something.

    I don't think it's common to call a phrasal verb simply a "phrasal".

    "Get round to" is British English (and maybe found in other Commonwealth countries too). In the USA, we say "get around to". "Get (a)round to" is both a phrasal verb and an idiom. It is a phrasal verb because the verb and the following particles form a single unit of meaning. It is an idiom because its meaning is not just the sum of the individual words' meanings. Some phrasal verbs are not idiomatic, such as "switch on" in "He switched the light on" or "pull off" in "She pulled off her shoe." However, many phrasal verbs are idiomatic.

    "Turn in" is an idiomatic phrasal verb.

    I hope that helps some.
    Well, it sure helped me. Thanks!


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    #7

    Re: to get round to

    Thank you Abaka. A question: you have said: "Practise saying them in your own sentences. When you find a new one in a book, movie, etc., make a note of it and try to use it.Have someone check your attempts." .
    May be that anyone in this forum check some of my attempts, or this kind of forum is not
    intended for reviewing? I mean, could I post some of the sentences to check?
    Well, thanks again. I am following your pieces of advice(?) when I have time to study.
    Best regards.


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    #8

    Thumbs up Re: to get round to

    Dear Particleman,
    Your explanation has certainly helped me quite a lot. Iīll keep on studying.
    I have a question: Is it important for a learner to distinguish between an idiom and a phrasal verb? Or is it more important to learn how to use them?
    Is there any grammar rule to apply to an idiom that cannot be applied to a phrasal verb? I know that some phrasal verbs are separable and others inseparables, but I donīt know if there is another crucial topic between them that a learner must know about.
    I hope to have been clear, Iīm not good at writing, as you see.
    Thanks.

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    #9

    Re: to get round to

    Yes, use this forum!

    But it would be even more useful to try out the sentences on people you know, and see how they react: the all-important human interaction.

    As regards "turned in", I think you've got it.


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    #10

    Re: to get round to

    Quote Originally Posted by MARAMARA View Post
    Dear Particleman,
    Your explanation has certainly helped me quite a lot. Iīll keep on studying.
    I have a question: Is it important for a learner to distinguish between an idiom and a phrasal verb? Or is it more important to learn how to use them?
    Is there any grammar rule to apply to an idiom that cannot be applied to a phrasal verb? I know that some phrasal verbs are separable and others inseparables, but I donīt know if there is another crucial topic between them that a learner must know about.
    I hope to have been clear, Iīm not good at writing, as you see.
    Thanks.
    It's much more important to learn to use phrasal verbs and idioms than to learn to distinguish between them. Regarding rules, I don't think there's a set of grammar rules that applies to all idioms. That's because idioms don't constitute a coherent grammatical category. Phrasal verbs, on the other hand, do constitute a grammatical category (with subcategories, like "separable" and "inseparable"), so it is possible to identify rules that are specific to phrasal verbs.

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