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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    grammitical terms

    What's the term for use of opposites from normal usage? Like "nighttime awakening."


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    #2

    Re: grammitical terms

    I don't understand the question. Are you searching for a term that describes something that may interrupt your sleep?

    Maybe a nightmare!

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    #3

    Re: grammitical terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    What's the term for use of opposites from normal usage? Like "nighttime awakening."
    'Nighttime awakening' does not appear to contain opposites. Awakening in the night is a common occurrence (at least, for me).

    Perhaps you mean 'oxymoron'. An oxymoron is a figure of speech that contains a (seeming) self-contradiction. For example:
    'ugly beauty', 'cruelly kind', 'bitter sweetness', 'slow haste', etc.

    Another possible term is paradox, a term that refers to a usage or proposition that contains an apparent self-contradiction. For example: 'deafening silence'.

    I hope this is helpful,

    Petra


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    #4

    Re: grammitical terms

    Its always fun to point out oxymorons because half the native speakers dont know the term.

    I always tell them its what happens when the umbilical cord wraps around the neck at birth leading to brain damage. They just accept the definition


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    #5

    Re: grammitical terms

    I'm still not sure what we're looking for.

    The condition you're describing may be referred to as insomnia or sleep apnea. But now we're getting into diagnosis before knowing exactly what the question is. But we'll keep trying!

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    #6

    Re: grammitical terms

    As I understand the original post, the student is not looking for a definition of 'nighttime awakening', but,

    What's the term for use of opposites from normal usage?


    Petra


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    #7

    Re: grammitical terms

    And you thought I was Baffled for no reason?

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    #8

    Re: grammitical terms

    Quote Originally Posted by thod00 View Post
    Its always fun to point out oxymorons because half the native speakers dont know the term.
    Just the moron half! We oxies do just fine!

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    #9

    Re: grammitical terms

    How about:
    An antiphrasis (from the Greek: ἀντί, antí, "opposite" and φράσις, phrásis, "diction") is a figure of speech that is a word used to mean the opposite of its usual sense, especially ironically.

    Can also be a group of words.

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