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    #1

    "I'm lovin' it"...

    ...i'm not by the way.

    I guess most of you have seen this slogan of that known fast food chain...

    But aren't people supposed to not use the -ing-form with certain verbs like "love", "hate" and so on?

    Apparently not...

    What exactly does the -ing-form imply here?

  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "I'm lovin' it"...

    Quote Originally Posted by inbochum View Post
    ...i'm not by the way.

    I guess most of you have seen this slogan of that known fast food chain...

    But aren't people supposed to not use the -ing-form with certain verbs like "love", "hate" and so on?

    Apparently not...

    What exactly does the -ing-form imply here?
    Okay:

    1. The -in' suffix is not standard English.

    2. Otherwise, the grammar is correct.

    3. What is the person doing? Loving. "I am loving it" has the subject, I, the verb, am loving, and the object, it.

    4. All verbs have an -ing form. No exceptions! Love and hate are verbs (I love you! I hate you!), so they have -ing forms.

    5. I've never heard this slogan.

    [I edit copy have tutored college writing.]

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    #3

    Re: "I'm lovin' it"...

    It's the current folksy McDonald's slogan. On the packaging, they translate it into several other languages. I believe the Spanish version actually translates to "it delights me".

    It's absolutely unclear what the "it" is that the speaker is supposed to be loving, but the commercials seem to imply that "it" means "life, while eating McDonald's food."


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    #4

    Re: "I'm lovin' it"...

    Thanks.

    I got this response on another forum:

    "I'm loving it" is a normal American colloquial expression, very common. Not wrong, not invented by McDonalds.
    But you are right on one point -- you don't usually use the continuous form for these verbs. So look on this as an exception to the rule.

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "I'm lovin' it"...

    Quote Originally Posted by inbochum View Post
    Thanks.

    I got this response on another forum:

    "I'm loving it" is a normal American colloquial expression, very common. Not wrong, not invented by McDonalds.
    But you are right on one point -- you don't usually use the continuous form for these verbs. So look on this as an exception to the rule.
    Sorry, this is just dead wrong. There's no rule, and therefore no exception to it. All verbs can and often do end with -ing. Period.

    [I edit copy and have tutored college writing.]


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    #6

    Re: "I'm lovin' it"...

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    Sorry, this is just dead wrong. There's no rule, and therefore no exception to it. All verbs can and often do end with -ing. Period.

    [I edit copy and have tutored college writing.]
    My Cambridge grammar says the following:

    Some verbs describing preferences and mental states (e.g. agree, believe, conclude, know, prefer) are rarely used with the present continious: "I believe you now. (not I'm believing you now.)

    Looks like a rule to me.


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    #7

    Re: "I'm lovin' it"...

    Generally speaking, the verbs expressing emotions and feelings are not normally used in the continuous tenses.
    But the continuous can be used with enjoy,and ocassionally like, love meaning 'enjoy'.*
    What is more, we can diffrentiate between two aspects as well:
    Permanent state:(in general)
    I love/enjoy parties.
    I like school.

    Short period:
    I am loving/enjoying this party.
    I'm liking school much better now.

    However, if you are not sure, it is safer to use the simple tenses.

    Hope, it clarifies the issue.

    * hence the McDonald's slogan: I'm lovin' it.
    Last edited by sirapple; 19-Feb-2009 at 18:53.

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    #8

    Re: "I'm lovin' it"...

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein View Post
    Okay:

    1. The -in' suffix is not standard English.

    2. Otherwise, the grammar is correct.

    3. What is the person doing? Loving. "I am loving it" has the subject, I, the verb, am loving, and the object, it.

    4. All verbs have an -ing form. No exceptions! Love and hate are verbs (I love you! I hate you!), so they have -ing forms.

    5. I've never heard this slogan.

    [I edit copy have tutored college writing.]
    Wow, there is a real person living in the USA who hasn't heard that slogan? The advertising agency which coined it would be horrified to find out!

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: "I'm lovin' it"...

    Quote Originally Posted by inbochum View Post
    My Cambridge grammar says the following:

    Some verbs describing preferences and mental states (e.g. agree, believe, conclude, know, prefer) are rarely used with the present continious: "I believe you now. (not I'm believing you now.)

    Looks like a rule to me.
    To me, too. But quantify rarely. Either believing is good grammar or it isn't. There's nothing wrong with the words loving, hating, or believing. They're perfectly functional, meaningful, usable words.

    Loving acting isn't the same thing as being a good actor.

    She spends too much time hating her lessons, and not enough time understanding them.

    Believing that Juliet was dead, he killed himself.


    Bottom line: I just don't think this is the big deal your grammar book wants to turn it into.
    Last edited by Charlie Bernstein; 18-Feb-2009 at 23:15.

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    #10

    Re: "I'm lovin' it"...

    Quote Originally Posted by Searching for language View Post
    Wow, there is a real person living in the USA who hasn't heard that slogan? The advertising agency which coined it would be horrified to find out!
    I guess I'm a real person. Pinch me and we'll know for sure....

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