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    #1

    bag and baggage = goods and chattels

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence from an English text?

    Lass, you may bring your bag and baggage and come over here and live for good.

    bag and baggage = goods and chattels; lock, stock and barrel

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 19-Feb-2009 at 12:08.

  1. SUDHKAMP's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: bag and baggage = goods and chattels

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence from an English text?

    Lass, you may bring your bag and baggage and come over here and live for good.

    bag and baggage = goods and chattels; lock, stock and burrel

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    IT should be "lock, stock and barrel" (U is not there in the barrel).

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: bag and baggage = goods and chattels

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence from an English text?

    Lass, you may bring your bag and baggage and come over here and live for good.

    bag and baggage = goods and chattels; lock, stock and barrel.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Yes, it's fine vil. Do you know where the expression 'lock, stock and barrel' comes from?

  3. SUDHKAMP's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: bag and baggage = goods and chattels

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Yes, it's fine vil. Do you know where the expression 'lock, stock and barrel' comes from?
    It would be interesting to listen from you, Bhaisahab!

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: bag and baggage = goods and chattels

    Quote Originally Posted by SUDHKAMP View Post
    It would be interesting to listen from you, Bhaisahab!
    The lock, the stock and the barrel are the parts of a flintlock musket (firearm). The stock is the wooden part, the lock is the firing mechanism and the barrel is, well, the barrel, as with a rifle. So, lock, stock and barrel is the entirety of the firearm.

  5. SUDHKAMP's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: bag and baggage = goods and chattels

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    The lock, the stock and the barrel are the parts of a flintlock musket (firearm). The stock is the wooden part, the lock is the firing mechanism and the barrel is, well, the barrel, as with a rifle. So, lock, stock and barrel is the entirety of the firearm.
    Can you please also quote how "giving the sack" term evolved?

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    #7

    Re: bag and baggage = goods and chattels

    Quote Originally Posted by SUDHKAMP View Post
    Can you please also quote how "giving the sack" term evolved?
    I have to say that I didn't know the origins of it, here is what I found:

    Get the sack

    Meaning
    To be dismissed from a job.
    Origin
    The probably derivation is the allusion to tradesmen, who owned their own tools, taking them with them in a bag or sack when they were dismissed from employment.
    The phrase has been known in France since the 17th century, as 'On luy a donné son sac'. The first recorded English version is in Charles Westmacott's The English Spy, 1825:
    "You munna split on me, or I shall get the zack for telling on ye."
    In his 1869 'Slang Dictionary', John Hotten records these alternatives - 'get the bag' (from the North of England) and 'get the empty' (from London).
    See also, the order of the boot.
    Copyright © Gary Martin, 1996 - 2009

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    #8

    Re: bag and baggage = goods and chattels

    Hi SUDHKAMP,

    I found another interpretation of the expression in question:

    sacked = the act of whacking/slapping/kicking/punching/head butting/kneeing or throwing something at someones nuts

    sacked = to be fired from ones place of employment.

    Also, to get "the sack".

    "Sorry guys, can't go out tonight. I've got to save money since I was sacked today"

    "Hey, did you hear Tracey got the sack?"

    Regards,

    V.


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    #9

    Re: bag and baggage = goods and chattels

    sacked = the act of whacking/slapping/kicking/punching/head butting/kneeing or throwing something at someones nuts


    As in the circumciser who missed and got the sack.

  7. SUDHKAMP's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: bag and baggage = goods and chattels

    Bhaisahab, you are very right in giving the account of "giving the sack".

    In the beginning of the Industrial era, each workman brought his own free tools to a factory, which were stored in a sack bearing the worker's name,in the factory stores. Each day he would collect his tools on the beginning of the day, and while leaving for home, he would deposit the same, in his sack.

    When the foreman was not happy with a particular labour, he would ask him to leave, and also give his "sack" of tools!

    Thus the term "giving the sack".(I read this years ago, in the Reader's Digest).

    The same is now used for removing one from the job.

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