Results 1 to 3 of 3

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 47
    #1

    Is 'savvy' OK to use?

    Teachers,

    If you want to say to the person you're talking to right now that he has a lot of knowledge on many things...

    Would the followings make sense?
    1. You are very knowledgeable.
      or  You are a knowledgeable person.
    2. You are very savvy.
      or  You are a savvy person.
    3. You know a lot of things.

    Or anything else that you would say in this situation??

    Thank you very much.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 907
    #2

    Re: Is 'savvy' OK to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by jibou View Post
    Teachers,

    If you want to say to the person you're talking to right now that he has a lot of knowledge on many things...

    Would the followings make sense?
    1. You are very knowledgeable.
      or  You are a knowledgeable person.
    2. You are very savvy.
      or  You are a savvy person. Savvy has a connotation of worldliness as well as knowledge.
    3. You know a lots of things.
    or: You know a lot.

    Or anything else that you would say in this situation??

    Thank you very much.
    Also possible:

    You seem very well-informed.


    Best wishes,

    Petra

  1. Monticello's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 455
    #3

    Re: Is 'savvy' OK to use?

    Hi Jibou,

    For questions concerning usage such as yours, it is best to refer to a dictionary.

    Being from the USA, my preferred dictionary is the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (Fourth Edition), which can be accessed online at the following link:

    http://www.bartleby.com/61/

    Within the Entry Word field of the form returned from the above link, type in the word you wish to search and hit <Enter>. (You might want to try this now with the word savvy.)


    The entry returned for "savvy" shows that it can be used as an adjective, a noun, or an adverb. Further, the examples (italicized in the entry returned) also show that the word’s usage usually refers to shrewd knowledge in a specific area.

    Thus, while it would not be entirely incorrect to say: “He’s a savvy person.”, this would definitely fall outside common usage, since both of the examples in the entry returned are used to describe specific areas of knowledge.

    Just to drive the point home, here’s a few more examples:
    - a savvy politician (adj.)
    - He has political savvy. (noun)
    - a ballplayer who is savvy about the rules of the game
    Perhaps now you can create a few examples of your own based upon your own circumstances. After all, in social situations, most of us are savvy about what people have come to expect from us!

    By the way, a person who demonstrates formidable knowledge in many areas is often referred to as a polymath.
    Last edited by Monticello; 21-Feb-2009 at 06:19.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •