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    #1

    the?

    Dear Friends,

    My corpus-based search has found matces for both but would you natives use 'the' in the following:

    Discourse irony involves processing the more salient (though contextually incompatible) literal meaning initially, which is later revised to satisfy the contextual bias?

    Thanks a lot.

    Palinkasocsi

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    #2

    Re: the?

    Dear palinkasocsi:

    Yes, either will work. The use of 'the' is most appropriate if you are referring to a particular contextual bias (of which the reader is aware).

    All best wishes,

    Petra

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    #3

    Re: the?

    Quote Originally Posted by palinkasocsi View Post
    Dear Friends,
    Quote Originally Posted by palinkasocsi View Post

    My corpus-based search has found matces for both but would you natives use 'the' in the following:

    Discourse irony involves processing the more salient (though contextually incompatible) literal meaning initially, which is later revised to satisfy the contextual bias?

    Thanks a lot.

    Palinkasocsi
    Hi Palinkasocsi,

    From reading just this single sentence, it appears to me either one would do.

    This sentence appears to be excerpted from an essay that analyzes and classifies different types of irony that may be found within (English?) literature. As such, its audience will be a specialized academic one.

    Your post here is now my introduction to the topic of "discourse irony," as well as its apparent associative term, "contextual bias." Nonetheless, without any knowledge about the specifics of these two terms, one may still be able to discuss the subtle nuance brought to bear upon the meaning of the sentence by the inclusion or omission of the article "the" in the sentence you cite. And this subtle nuance is simply this:

    By omitting the article, the sentence speaks of "contextual bias" in a more general way; including the article ("the contextual bias") provides a degree more specificity concerning this abstract term. What kind of specificity? To answer that, I would need more background knowledge on the topic, as well as a “read-through” of the article from which it has been excerpted.

    As to what the author of this sentence truly intended, my question is: Why the difference? Would it be due to the fact that the original source is not English and the two sentences are thus two different translations? (-highly improbable, given how close the two sentences are in every other respect.) Or did an editor make a mistake in transcribing the original text? (That’s my guess. The author’s writing style here is technical and analytical. So I doubt very much that s/he would have created two different versions of such an exacting text.)

    I would be interested in knowing what the original source is, as well as its author.

    BTW - Without any background on the topic, the original article, or its author, my preference is for omitting of the article.
    Last edited by Monticello; 22-Feb-2009 at 07:02.


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    #4

    Re: the?

    Dear Petra,

    Thank you for your useful reply.

    Take care,

    Palinkasocsi
    Last edited by palinkasocsi; 22-Feb-2009 at 11:51.


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    #5

    Re: the?

    Quote Originally Posted by Monticello View Post


    As to what the author of this sentence truly intended, my question is: Why the difference? Would it be due to the fact that the original source is not English and the two sentences are thus two different translations? (-highly improbable, given how close the two sentences are in every other respect.) Or did an editor make a mistake in transcribing the original text? (Thatís my guess. The authorís writing style here is technical and analytical. So I doubt very much that s/he would have created two different versions of such an exacting text.)

    I would be interested in knowing what the original source is, as well as its author.
    Dear Monticello,

    I am currently writing a paper on verbal irony, so the author is myself. The sentence is not a translation from another language, it was actually coined by me. I am, of course, aware of the grammar about the definite article. All I wanted was just a feedback (or confirmation) from natives. -- or from the natives? -- Joke.

    Thank you for your profound reply.

    Palinkasocsi

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    #6

    Re: the?

    Quote Originally Posted by palinkasocsi View Post
    Dear Monticello,

    I am currently writing a paper on verbal irony, so the author is myself. The sentence is not a translation from another language, it was actually coined by me. I am, of course, aware of the grammar about the definite article. All I wanted was just a feedback (or confirmation) from natives. -- or from the natives? -- Joke.

    Thank you for your profound reply.

    Palinkasocsi
    Hi Palinkasocsi,

    When your first post said that: "My corpus-based search has found ...", I just assumed that the author was someone other than yourself. But you know what that say when you assume ("You make an ass out of you (u) and me.") -- Sorry, just couldn't resist using this tired cliche.

    BTW (By the way), last night I was so intrigued by your sentence (again, not being aware that you were its author) that I did a Google search on "discourse irony" + "contextual bias" which, at the time, returned just one link:

    http://www.tau.ac.il/~giorar/files/Giora1998_Irony.pdf

    This link led me to:

    http://www.amazon.com/Our-Mind-Salience-Figurative-Language/dp/0195136160/ref=sr_11_1/180-4458236-0779655?ie=UTF8&qid=1235276572&sr=11-1

    where I was able to browse through its prologue and first few pages -- very interesting and thought-provoking stuff!

    Are you at all familiar with this book -- On Our Mind: Salience, Context, and Figurative Language, by Rachel Giora? I'd be interested in knowing to what degree your current writing relates to her book -- if at all.

    Thanks!

    PS: BTW, With a Google update between last night and now, a search on "discourse irony" + "contextual bias" also returns two links to your posts in this thread.
    Last edited by Monticello; 22-Feb-2009 at 19:09.


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    #7

    Re: the?

    Hi Monticello,

    Yes, I know Goira's book (On Our Mind: Salience, Context, and Figurative Language) well, as well as her papers. I'm currently writing a study on verbal irony representation and part of it is a fierce criticism of Giora's 'graded salience hypothesis' and 'indirect negation view'.

    Thanks for the links, anyway.

    Palinkasocsi
    Last edited by palinkasocsi; 25-Feb-2009 at 18:09.

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    #8

    Re: the?

    Hi palinkasocsi,

    Thanks for the info. Best of luck with your paper.


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    #9

    Re: the?

    Hi Monticello,


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