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    #1

    what does this phrase mean?

    The rules of quotidian face-to-face life are suspended or even inverted in a carnivalesque of norms.
    This is not for an English assignment or anything of that sort, it's just a curious phrase I came upon. I mainly have a problem with the understanding of 'a carnivalesque of norms' and the relation with of that group of words with the first part of the phrase.

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    #2

    Re: what does this phrase mean?

    Is this a play or movie review?

    The rules of quotidian face-to-face life are suspended or even inverted in a carnivalesque of norms.

    bascially means:

    The norms of everyday life get turned upside down when put into a setting where humor and chaos are the norm.

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    #3

    Re: what does this phrase mean?

    What was the context?

    'Carnivalesque' has associations with the Feast of Fools, where power roles were temporarily reversed, so whatever the sentence refers to would have a similar re-ordering of the normal social roles. Does this help?


    • Join Date: Nov 2008
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    #4

    Re: what does this phrase mean?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    What was the context?

    'Carnivalesque' has associations with the Feast of Fools, where power roles were temporarily reversed, so whatever the sentence refers to would have a similar re-ordering of the normal social roles. Does this help?

    Like in "The Hunchback of Notre Dame". Yes, I get it now. Talk about throwing a lot of difficult words into one sentence. It's chinese water torture for non-native speakers.

    thx for the help.

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