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    #1

    Unhappy Nominative and Accusative case

    Hi,

    I am learning English grammar using Wren & Martin's High school English grammar book. I am also referring to "Keys to wren & martin" book for solutions to exercises. Currently I am working on Nominative and accusative case exercises.

    The exercise asks us to identify the correct case for the sentence

    "Here is the book that you lent me"

    In the above sentence, there are 2 verbs.

    1. is
    2. lent

    The verb is comes before the noun book. The verb lent comes after the verb book.

    As per Wren & Martin concepts, if the verb comes before the noun, then the sentence is in Nominative case and it is in Accusative case otherwise.

    so I think this is in Nominative case, since, the verb is comes before the Noun book.

    But the Keys to Wren & Martin, mentions that the above sentence is in Accusative case

    I am totally confused now. can somebody please help me ?

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    #2

    Re: Nominative and Accusative case

    Quote Originally Posted by vikas951951 View Post
    Hi,

    I am learning English grammar using Wren & Martin's High school English grammar book. I am also referring to "Keys to wren & martin" book for solutions to exercises. Currently I am working on Nominative and accusative case exercises.

    The exercise asks us to identify the correct case for the sentence

    "Here is the book that you lent me"

    In the above sentence, there are 2 verbs.

    1. is
    2. lent

    The verb is comes before the noun book. The verb lent comes after the verb book.

    As per Wren & Martin concepts, if the verb comes before the noun, then the sentence is in Nominative case and it is in Accusative case otherwise.

    so I think this is in Nominative case, since, the verb is comes before the Noun book.

    But the Keys to Wren & Martin, mentions that the above sentence is in Accusative case

    I am totally confused now. can somebody please help me ?
    The verb 'to lend' (lent) comes before the pronoun 'me'.


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    #3

    Re: Nominative and Accusative case

    OK.
    But then consider this sentence

    "This is the juggler whom we saw yesterday"

    the pronoun we comes before the verb Saw. so, isn't it true that the above sentence is in Nominative ? or should we consider Yesterday ? What is the theory ? I am really not getting the complete theory

    Also, consider even this sentence.

    They that seek wisdom will be wise

    The verb seek comes before the abstract noun wisdom. so I feel it should be in Accusative case. But is doesn't seem to be the answer!

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    #4

    Re: Nominative and Accusative case

    Quote Originally Posted by vikas951951 View Post
    Hi,

    "Here is the book that you lent me"

    I'm not a teacher, not even a student.


    The whole sentence can't be in the accusative case (or in the dative, or in the nominative). Only nouns and pronouns can be "in the case". For example:

    Accusative case (ACC)
    Dative case (DC)
    Nominative case (NC)

    John gave a book to Mary.


    John - NC
    a book - ACC
    to Mary - DC.

    Remember that "here is"(there is/there are) takes the accusative case.

    Your sentence:

    "Here is the book that you lent me"

    the book - in the accusative case. (see the rule above)

    me - in the dative case.

    You must always put questions(who, what, to whom, which etc.) to define the case.
    Last edited by Nicky_K; 22-Feb-2009 at 18:47.

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    #5

    Re: Nominative and Accusative case

    I'm not that convinced that this is a theory worth getting. Firstly, nominative and accusative, as Nicky says, refer to the nouns, nouns phrases, pronouns and gerunds that can be the subject or object of a verb. Given that verbs have subjects, except for imperatives where the subject is usually implied and not stated, I am honestly not sure what an accusative case sentence is.

    In your example you have a sentence that is a combination:
    This is the juggler- juggler is a complement here
    whom we saw = we saw the juggler- here, we is the subject and the juggler is the object.

    While it is usually true that subjects comes before the verb and objects after it, it is not always the case. In cleft sentences, sentences with a relative pronoun that is the subject of one verb and the object of the other, the order may be different.

    Indeed, with some imperatives, the addressee may come after the verb (the form 'Go ye' is used in the Bible, 'ye' being an old form for 'you', and forms like 'go, you fools' still occur, normally with a comma).

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    #6

    Re: Nominative and Accusative case

    I'm not that convinced that this is a theory worth getting. Firstly, nominative and accusative, as Nicky says, refer to the nouns, nouns phrases, pronouns and gerunds that can be the subject or object of a verb. Given that verbs have subjects, except for imperatives where the subject is usually implied and not stated, I am honestly not sure what an accusative case sentence is.

    In your example you have a sentence that is a combination:
    This is the juggler- juggler is a complement here
    whom we saw = we saw the juggler- here, we is the subject and the juggler is the object.

    While it is usually true that subjects comes before the verb and objects after it, it is not always the case. In cleft sentences, sentences with a relative pronoun that is the subject of one verb and the object of the other, the order may be different.

    Indeed, with some imperatives, the addressee may come after the verb (the form 'Go ye' is used in the Bible, 'ye' being an old form for 'you', and forms like 'go, you fools' still occur, normally with a comma).

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