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    #1

    Here are or there are?

    Dear teachers,

    Please see this passage below and show me whether the phrase "here are" (which is underlined, bold and italic) is reasonable or we must use "there are":

    There is a popular belief among parents that schools are no longer interested in spelling. No school I have taught in has ever considered spelling unimportant as a basic skill. There are, however, quite different ideas about how to teach it, or how much priority it must be given over general language development and writing ability. The problem is, how to encourage a child to express himself freely in writing without holding him back with spelling.
    If spelling becomes the only point of his teacher's interest, clearly a bright child will be likely to play safe. He will write only words within his spelling range. That's why teachers often encourage the early use of dictionaries and pay attention to content rather than technical ability.
    I was once shocked to read on the bottom of a sensitive piece of writing about a personal experience. "This work is terrible! Here are far too many spelling mistakes. " It may have been a sharp criticism of the pupil's technical abilities in writing, but it was also a sad thing for the teacher who had omitted to read the composition, which contained some beautiful expressions of the child's deep feelings. The teacher was not wrong to draw attention to the mistakes, but if his priority had centered on the child's ideas, and expression of his disappointment with the presentation would have given the pupil more hope to seek improvement.

    Thank you very much.


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    #2

    Re: Here are or there are?

    " Here are far too many spelling mistakes. "

    " There
    are far too many spelling mistakes here ", would seem more appropriate.

  1. Monticello's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Here are or there are?

    Hi phoenixqn81,

    "There are far too many spelling mistakes" would have worked better IMO. If this teacher really wanted to use "here" in his/her comment, then s/he should have written something like: "Your work here shows far too many spelling mistakes."

    Appears as if this teacher is not only insensitive, but also lacks command of the basics of the content knowledge.

    "Take it from whence it comes." - as the saying goes.

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    #4

    Re: Here are or there are?

    Quote Originally Posted by Monticello View Post
    Hi phoenixqn81,

    "There are far too many spelling mistakes" would have worked better IMO. If this teacher really wanted to use "here" in his/her comment, then s/he should have written something like: "Your work here shows far too many spelling mistakes."

    Appears as if this teacher is not only insensitive, but also lacks command of the basics of the content knowledge.

    "Take it from whence it comes." - as the saying goes.
    Ah, "Take it from whence it comes." What does it mean, Monticello?

  2. Monticello's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Here are or there are?

    whence PRONUNCIATION: hwns, wnsADVERB:1. From where; from what place: Whence came this traveler? 2. From what origin or source: Whence comes this splendid feast? CONJUNCTION:1. Out of which place; from or out of which. 2. By reason of which; from which: The dog was coal black from nose to tail, whence the name Shadow.

    "Take it from whence it comes" is actually an incorrect construction since whence (see above entry from The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition) already means "from where." Thus, literally the phrase means:
    "Take it from from where it comes." ???!!!
    But I didn't invent the phrase -- just passing it on.

    What it means is consider the source, that is, consider the peron's past actions, and then judge them accordingly.

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    #6

    Re: Here are or there are?

    Quote Originally Posted by Monticello View Post
    whence PRONUNCIATION: hwns, wnsADVERB:1. From where; from what place: Whence came this traveler? 2. From what origin or source: Whence comes this splendid feast? CONJUNCTION:1. Out of which place; from or out of which. 2. By reason of which; from which: The dog was coal black from nose to tail, whence the name Shadow.

    "Take it from whence it comes" is actually an incorrect construction since whence (see above entry from The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition) already means "from where." Thus, literally the phrase means:
    "Take it from from where it comes." ???!!!
    But I didn't invent the phrase -- just passing it on.

    What it means is consider the source, that is, consider the peron's past actions, and then judge them accordingly.
    While looking up the dictionary, I also found such a redundancy - "from from where". Thank you so much.

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