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  1. bepina's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 29
    #1

    all monies??

    I recently read one contract put by one British travel agency and I found the following: "All monies will be paid prior to.."
    Now, I was sure that the noun money cannot be put into plural, except when it is used in informal speech and I found in one dictionary that the use of "monies" was obsolete..

    Is it correct to use the above mentioned word in plural, in official documents such as contract and in general?

    It seem that every time I learn some rule I stumble upon an exception.. :(


    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 364
    #2

    Re: all monies??

    Legalese is not normal English. The terms and expressions used have developed down the centuries to have very precise meanings to prevent the lawyers arguing over semantics.

    Do contract lawyers in your country write in everyday speech? For example I could argue that the contract said dollars, which is not legal tender in the UK, hence it is not money.

  2. bepina's Avatar

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 29
    #3

    Re: all monies??

    So, is it correct to use the plural of money if we are talking about contract?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
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      • UK
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    • Join Date: Jan 2009
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    #4

    Re: all monies??

    Yes, it is!

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