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    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #1

    Post None and neither

    I have sth unclear
    ex: none of the cars (were/was) stopped by the police.
    neither of us (travel/travels) on public transport much.
    Can you help me? Thanks in advance

  1. engee30's Avatar
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    #2

    Cool Re: None and neither

    Quote Originally Posted by Kirsten P View Post
    I have sth unclear
    ex: none of the cars (were/was) stopped by the police.
    neither of us (travel/travels) on public transport much.
    Can you help me? Thanks in advance
    None of the cars was (formal usage)/were (common usage) stopped by the police.
    Neither of us travels (formal usage)/travel (colloquial usage) on public transport much.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #3

    Re: None and neither

    None of the cars was (formal usage)/were (common usage) stopped by the police.
    Neither of us travels (formal usage)/travel (colloquial usage) on public transport much.


    Not down my street. The use of the plural here is not 'colloquial', just bad grammar.

  2. engee30's Avatar
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    #4

    Cool Re: None and neither

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    None of the cars was (formal usage)/were (common usage) stopped by the police.
    Neither of us travels (formal usage)/travel (colloquial usage) on public transport much.


    Not down my street. The use of the plural here is not 'colloquial', just bad grammar.
    I think it's about how you look at it.

    Neither (taken as not either) sounds like a singular pronoun, and therefore requires a singular verb:
    Neither travels on public transport.

    However, being used with the preposition of, neither can easily take a plural verb, since the object of of is always plural, and this usage can be justified as proximity agreement following the object:
    Neither of us travel on public transport.

    As to none, none can mean no(t) one or not any and can be used with a singular or plural verb depending upon which option you might choose.



    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #5

    Re: None and neither

    The agreement between subject and verb has nothing to do with the use of the preposition 'of'.

    'neither' is used where two things/persons are concerned, and regards each of them separately. Consequently, if each thing/person is singular, then the verb must be singular.
    Both John and Peter were invited, but neither has accepted.
    Neither John nor Peter has accepted.


    If each of the subjects is plural, a plural verb is used:
    Both the Conservatives and the Liberals are to contest the seat, but neither have announced their candidate.

    with 'neither of them', the verb agrees with 'neither' - and will be singular or plural as per the above - not with the noun after the preposition.

    Note: whilst 'neither' is restricted to considering two things, 'neither...nor' is not:
    Neither words nor deed nor sentiment will sway my hand.

  3. engee30's Avatar
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    #6

    Thumbs up Re: None and neither

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    [...]
    with 'neither of them', the verb agrees with 'neither' - and will be singular or plural as per the above - not with the noun after the preposition.
    It's nice that you were able to admit that either verb form is possible to be used.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #7

    Re: None and neither

    engee30:It's nice that you were able to admit that either verb form is possible to be used.

    It's a little difficult to 'admit' to something before it comes under discussion. My original post was responding specifically to two sentences, not addressing the used of 'neither' and 'neither...nor' and variations on verb agreement.

    It is such lack of regard for a specific point under discussion, and close attention to the logical flow as points are clarified, that really muddles threads. I know, I generally give up trying to make sense of threads after 5 people have willy-nilly thrown in side issues on a theme and stirred the resultant slurry.

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