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    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 55
    #1

    Abous some phrasal verbs usage

    My question is if the usage of the phrasal verbs and quantifiers in the next paragraph is right. I hope to receive your corrections.
    Mary was always able to come up with her family problems. She was pretty skilled and acted with selflessness, in spite of the fact that she could have been worn out by their financial situation. I mean, she has been getting along with the house since she got divorced from her husband, who only brought about bad moments in their lives. Actually, Mary has come up against a great many difficulties: Illnesses, unemployment, sadness, as many dark days in these last ten years
    Thanks in advance


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #2

    Re: Abous some phrasal verbs usage

    'to come up with' : come up with, produce (something e.g. new ideas, answers to problems), especially when pressured or challenged.

    If one comes up with ideas, answers etc., what would it mean if Mary was 'able to come up with her family problems' - it sounds as if, for example, the script writers of a soap were stuck for plot lines, Mary would tell them about problems in her dysfunctional family and they'd use those.
    I don't think that's your intended meaning!

    in spite of the fact that she could have been worn out by their financial situation NO

    in spite of the fact that she was (nearly) worn out worrying about their financial situation.

    she has been getting along with the house since she got divorced from her husband,
    What you are trying to say here isn't clear. Relations with her husband may be strained, but she and the house are getting along fine!

    'getting along with' :You could be asking how two people are getting along with each other (whether they are working/living together harmoniously or not.

    ...her husband, who only brought about bad moments in their lives
    'to bring about' does mean 'cause something to happen' but we would not use it in this context.
    ...her husband, who only brought grief and unhappiness into her life.
    Margaret Thatcher's downfall was brought about by her refusal to...
    Margaret Thatcher's refusal to... brought about her downfall.

    (Just been watching Michael Portillo's excellent documentary on Margaret Thatcher's legacy, and the Conservative Party.)
    Last edited by David L.; 26-Feb-2009 at 18:47.


    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 55
    #3

    Unhappy Re: Abous some phrasal verbs usage

    David L: Well, thank you!!!! I can see all the efforts that all of you always put in this forum. But I am only a learner of English language. I mean, I cannot understand how to learn the usage of phrasal verbs in a right context. For this reason, I ask you for giving me some examples of the phrasal verbs I´ve written: to come up with, to wear out, to get along,to bring about.
    A few sentences of your own, like native speakers, would help me a lot!!!
    My best wishes, I´m so thanked!!!


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #4

    Re: Abous some phrasal verbs usage

    You do sound like a cheery soul!
    OK. But so that you are not over-loaded with two much information about two many phrasal verbs in one go, let's do a Phrasal Verb of the Day for the next week.
    For the next 24 hours, the phrasal verb is: 'to come up with'.

    My two sentences:
    "The advertising agency called together its top creative writers to come up with ideas for the launch of their client's new product."

    "I had the chance to buy a second-hand Porsche. The owner was selling it really cheap, but even so, I couldn't come up with the money quickly enough, and somebody else snapped it up."
    (This does not mean we were like to gun-slingers and he beat me to the draw in getting out our wallets. It implies that I did not have the full asking price in ready money in the bank, and had to, say, ask the bank for a loan, or sell one of my other cars, to raise the full amount of money being asked.)

    Can others post some examples? Stick to just 'to come up with' for today.
    Last edited by David L.; 28-Feb-2009 at 07:21.


    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 55
    #5

    Re: Abous some phrasal verbs usage

    Well, David L., thank you a lot!!!!!!!!!( You do sound like a cheery soul! ) It has been the best praise for me, but I should read your so useful posts carefully to answer you.
    I´mgoing to do it during the next days, and I´m asking for your opinion.
    Thanks, all of you are the best!!!!!!!!!!


    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 55
    #6

    Re: Abous some phrasal verbs usage

    Well, David L. I would like to know if the usage of the phrasal verb is right, regarding to your last explanation:
    I have a dog that can´t walk quietly when we are at the street. I will have to look for a trainet. He might come up with new orders or movements, so that my dog could obey me.
    We had an only TV at home and one of my children came up with a new one for all of us yesterday night.

    In my first sentence, could it be better? Mary was always able to come up with amazing ideas to solve the family problems.
    I hope to have understood.
    tHANKS


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #7

    Re: Abous some phrasal verbs usage

    1. Mary was always able to come up with amazing ideas to sort out the family problems.
    GOOD
    'family problems' are not as straightforward as an algebraic equation that you can really 'solve' them. It's not incorrect, but a better expression is 'sort out'

    2. I have a dog that can´t walk quietly when we are out in the street. I will have to look for a trainer. He might come up with new orders or movements, so that my dog will obey me.
    GOOD

    3. We had an only TV at home : We only had one TV at home

    and one of my children came up with a new one for all of us yesterday night.
    What was the problem, the challenge? Finding a second TV set doesn't seem an undertaking requiring a great deal of ingenuity, n'est-ce pas?
    If the aerial was stolen from your roof, and you really wanted to watch the Oscars, then one of your children might have come up with the idea of tying a few wire coat hangers together, and hanging it from a ceiling light.

    If you were on a Treasure Hunt, and one of the items was a valve radio, and when all were despairing, one person (Mary) thinks of some little old lady she knows, goes off on her own and knocks on her door, and sure enough, in her basement...
    Here, she 'came up with' the bright idea about asking the lady; and she 'came up with' the item they thought they'd miss out on from the list, and so, not win the competition.
    Last edited by David L.; 01-Mar-2009 at 17:11.


    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 55
    #8

    Thumbs up Re: Abous some phrasal verbs usage

    Great, David L., thanks!!! It is much more clear for me.
    When you have the time, please, write me some examples on the other phrasal verbs:to wear out, to get along,to bring about.But only if you want and have some time free.
    Thanks a lot!


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #9

    Re: Abous some phrasal verbs usage

    OK. The next we'll tackle is "to get along (with/without)."
    This has two meanings, depending on the preposition:

    1. have a harmonious or friendly relationship (with someone)
    A lady looks after 6 children during the day (all from different families) while their parents are at work. They play happily together. The lady minding the children might reassure one of the parents, worried in case their is any fighting or that her child is being bullied, by saying, "No, they all seem to get along pretty well together."

    2. manage to live or survive (without someone)
    A woman has been a driving force in her work for a local charity. She has organized many fund-raising activities, been on many committees, and acted as Treasurer for years. She is now moving to another state. At a farewell party organized by the charity, to thank her, the President of the charity might acknowledge how much she has done for the charity and say, "I think everyone shares my feeling when I say, I don't know how we are going to get along without you."
    Understand - 'cometh the hour, cometh the man', and 'nobody is indispensable' : someone else in the community will be found to fill her shoes. However, the President's remark is a way of expressing how much they have benefitted and depended on her efforts for the charity, as if, the charity itself won't survive without her.
    Last edited by David L.; 01-Mar-2009 at 21:58.


    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 55
    #10

    Thumbs up Re: Abous some phrasal verbs usage

    Hi, David L. With regards to your sentences, might it be right to say?
    We have had a good marriage during the last ten years. We had been getting along together. Now, you´re telling me that you would prefer to stay some time alone. How do you suppose I could get along without you?
    Please, correct my mistakes. Your help has been very important for me until now- Thank you.

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