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    • Join Date: Nov 2008
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    #1

    Is this sentence technically correct?

    We shall now describe the process whereby the plan of the process is effective.

    Plan = "send in the cops" and "prosecute all criminals"

    Process = "the authority arresting the criminals" and "prosecuting all the criminals"

    Effect of the plan = "crime reduction"

    Effect of the process = "crime reduction"
    =================================
    NOTE:

    The plan cannot have a direct effect, however, we often write as if it has:

    The plan will have the effect of centralizing reserves and making them available.

    http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive...679C946096D6CF

    Through the process, the plan has an effect, maybe indirectly, or perhaps we mean the "execution of the plan", "plan" for short.
    =================================

    Please, explain why you think so.

  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Is this sentence technically correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by confidenceman View Post
    We shall now describe the process whereby the plan of the process is effective.

    ?

    Plan = "send in the cops" and "prosecute all criminals"

    Process = "the authority arresting the criminals" and "prosecuting all the criminals"

    ?

    Effect of the plan = "crime reduction"

    Effect of the process = "crime reduction"
    =================================
    NOTE:

    The plan cannot have a direct effect, however, we often write as if it has:

    The plan will have the effect of centralizing reserves and making them available.

    ?

    http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive...679C946096D6CF

    Through the process, the plan has an effect, maybe indirectly, or perhaps we mean the "execution of the plan", "plan" for short.

    ?
    =================================

    Please, explain why you think so. Why I think what?
    If you're asking whether it's grammatical, yes, it is. It makes no sense to me, though. I only have a vague idea of what any of it means.

    (A plan of a process is confusing enough, but - a process whereby a plan of a process....?!)


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    #3

    Re: Is this sentence technically correct?

    By We shall now describe the process whereby the plan of the process is effective I meant:

    We shall now describe the process through which the plan of the process has the intended effect(s).


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    #4

    Re: Is this sentence technically correct?

    I would like to know if the sentence is semantically correct.


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    #5

    Re: Is this sentence technically correct?

    It might be like saying:

    Let's talk about my enemy's punches through which his intent to hurt me has an effect on me.

    Now, tell me if that sentence is correct semantically and why.

    Also, tell me what people mean when they say "a plan has an effect" because it can be argued that "a plan does not have a direct effect" either and both sentences must be both wrong or right semantically.

  2. Monticello's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Is this sentence technically correct?

    Hi confidenceman,

    As I read through the previous posts, the questions that come to my mind are: (1) Who are the intended readers? (2) Will this audience already be familiar with your terminology? - and if so, to what extent?

    Without any knowledge as to your intended reading audience, I, too, as a general reader, find your statements grammatically clear but semantically cloudy:
    "We shall now describe the process whereby the plan of the process is effective(.)"

    "We shall now describe the process through which the plan of the process has the intended effect(s)."
    - And perhaps some confusion arises from the interatively redundant nature of which you write, i.e., a process within a process. To avoid the knotted and gnarled aspect of your sentence, why not try something such as:
    Let's now step through a review of the (above described) process, focusing on its planning and resulting intended effects:


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    #7

    Re: Is this sentence technically correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Monticello View Post
    Hi confidenceman,

    As I read through the previous posts, the questions that come to my mind are: (1) Who are the intended readers? (2) Will this audience already be familiar with your terminology? - and if so, to what extent?

    Without any knowledge as to your intended reading audience, I, too, as a general reader, find your statements grammatically clear but semantically cloudy:
    "We shall now describe the process whereby the plan of the process is effective(.)"

    "We shall now describe the process through which the plan of the process has the intended effect(s)."
    - And perhaps some confusion arises from the interatively redundant nature of which you write, i.e., a process within a process. To avoid the knotted and gnarled aspect of your sentence, why not try something such as:
    Let's now step through a review of the (above described) process, focusing on its planning and resulting intended effects:
    Hi, thank you for your response. Do you think it is semantically wrong though? I admit that it is not a very eloquent sentence. However, I was just wondering if semantically such sentence was correct.

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Is this sentence technically correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by confidenceman View Post
    I would like to know if the sentence is semantically correct.
    No. For the reasons I gave you above, it doesn't make sense to me.

  4. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Is this sentence technically correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by confidenceman View Post
    Hi, thank you for your response. Do you think it is semantically wrong though? I admit that it is not a very eloquent sentence. However, I was just wondering if semantically such sentence was correct.
    Again, "process whereby the plan of the process" doesn't work. Neither does "plan of the process" all by itself.

    Montecello's rephrasing is very clear. Does it get at what you're trying to say?


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    #10

    Re: Is this sentence technically correct?

    I wanted to say that the plan is intimately associated with the process, the process is actually the execution of the plan. How should I say what I want to say without giving up the clause "whereby the process.."?

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