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  1. she'sarebel
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    #1

    Smile coffee problems

    Hello,
    I would be thankful if you could help me with my translation:

    1) is the sentence "They can relish the taste of the morning coffee for a couple of hours." natural and well-constructed? maybe I should use "delight in the taste of the morning coffee"?

    2) is the tense correct in such a sentence: "They do't mind that their coffee has gone cold or the glass has become empty."

    3) can the atmosphere of the place be soothing or should I use calimng, tranquilising (I need the meaning that it is pleasant and helps to relax)?

    4) is the phrase "fierce debate on sth" correct?

    5) can I say that "the sun is almost at its zenith"? or maybe at its highest point?

    I'm sorry for so much questions, but I hope I will learn a lot from your opinions:)

  2. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: coffee problems

    Quote Originally Posted by she'sarebel View Post
    Hello,
    I would be thankful if you could help me with my translation:

    1) Is the sentence "They can relish the taste of the morning coffee for a couple of hours" natural and well-constructed? Maybe I should use "delight in the taste of the morning coffee."

    2) Is the tense correct in such a sentence: "They do't mind that their coffee has gone cold or the glass has become empty."

    3) Can the atmosphere of the place be soothing or should I use calming, tranquilizing? (I need the meaning that it is pleasant and helps to relax.) Soothing and calming are good. Tranquilizing is bad.

    4) Is the phrase "fierce debate on sth" correct? No. "Sth"is not a word.

    5) Can I say that "the sun is almost at its zenith"? or maybe at its highest point? Yes. Or "It's almost noon."

    I'm sorry for so many questions, but I hope I will learn a lot from your opinions. :)
    Not at all. Good questions! Watch your capitals, though - I've seen people flunk papers for less!

    PS - I'm not sure - tranquilising might be right in Britain, but it's tranquilizing in the U.S.

  3. Monticello's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: coffee problems

    Hi she'sarebel,

    In regard to your question #3 from your original post, i.e. :
    3) can the atmosphere of the place be soothing or should I use calimng, tranquilising (I need the meaning that it is pleasant and helps to relax)?
    As noted above, soothing and calming are both OK as modifying adjectives for "atmosphere," but NOT tranquilising (American sp., tranquilizing). The use of the word tranquilizing suggests explicitly that one has been tranquilized, i.e., drugged.

    Use instead tranquil atmosphere. ( -no drugs -- explicitly -- involved in this case! )

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