Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2,333
    #1

    I did not like either/both of them

    1. I saw two pictures on the wall. I did not like either of them.

    2. I saw two pictures on the wall. I did not like both of them.

    I believe the second sentence is wrong, but why is it so?

    Many thanks.

  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 3,591
    #2

    Re: I did not like either/both of them

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    1. I saw two pictures on the wall. I did not like either of them.

    2. I saw two pictures on the wall. I did not like both of them.

    I believe the second sentence is wrong, but why is it so?

    Many thanks.
    Hi, Tan!

    You're right, 1 is right and 2 is wrong. You could rewrite 2 this way: "I disliked both of them."

    There's no grammatical reason. The difference is simply idiomatic. Number 2 makes perfect sense, but it would never be said that way.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2,333
    #3

    Re: I did not like either/both of them

    Many thanks, Charlie.

    Your explanation is logical.

Similar Threads

  1. either/both
    By navi tasan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 26-Aug-2004, 12:27

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •