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    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #1

    question about ['ve got] and [got]

    Teachers,

    "You have a nice watch." and "You've got a nice watch." , I know they both mean the same. But in place of the latter one, I often hear "You got a nice watch." also.

    So my question is What is the actual difference between ['ve got] and [got]? Just the abbreviation? Some say they mean the same and they are interchangeable. But at the same time many others suggest that one shouldn't use [got] , should stick with ['ve got] .

    What is the actual picture? Can anyone explain? How these:have, 've got, got, are actually used in real everyday conversation.

    Thank you.

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: question about ['ve got] and [got]

    Pronunciation is the cuprit here. When you say I've got in fast speech, the sound represented by the letter <v> is devoiced to [f], which is barely audible. That you can hardly head [f] makes it seem as if there isn't an [f] sound at all. The result, what we hear, I got.

    Written English: I've got
    Spoken English (fast speech): I got

    Non-Standard English, which is OK to use--it's the name 'Non-Standards' that's the problem--houses "I got". I use it... in spoken English.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #3

    Re: question about ['ve got] and [got]

    'You got...............,man."

    As spoken by the tough and the rough 'street-wise' hoodie types, inter alia, in LA and NY.

    I don't think they have any inkling what Present Perfect is, never mind faulty pronunciation.
    Last edited by David L.; 05-Mar-2009 at 15:09.

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    #4

    Re: question about ['ve got] and [got]

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    'You got...............,man."

    As spoken by the tough and the rough 'street-wise' hoodie types, inter alia, in LA and NY.

    I don't think they have any inkling what Present Perfect is, never mind faulty punctuation.
    You may want to reconsider your response. Or is it your intention to perpetuate the destruction of human dignity and spirit?


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    #5

    Re: question about ['ve got] and [got]

    I'm merely observing the Destructive Process in language change that has led to 'you got some guts, man' being a style of speech, and the actual intended words in individuals from a particular social stratum. In this instance, it is not a 'mishearing' but the complete absence of any intent, or even knowledge of the correct grammatical form to utter.

    Or is it your intention to perpetuate the destruction of human dignity and spirit?

    My additional observation as to the occurrence of this type of speech, can do that!?

    Re-read my post and tell me where the offence is, please, as I find your remark uncalled for and highly offensive.
    Last edited by David L.; 05-Mar-2009 at 16:13.

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    #6

    Re: question about ['ve got] and [got]

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    I'm merely observing the Destructive Process in language change ... .
    The assumption that language change is 'Destructive' is not a commonly held view, at least not in this century.

    Quote Originally Posted by David L.
    My additional observation as to the occurrence of this type of speech, can do that!?
    Really... ? How so?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L.
    Re-read my post and tell me where the offence is, please, as I find your remark uncalled for and highly offensive.
    That makes two of us, not to mention the 'they' you refer to in your initial post.

    ______________
    Next time you may want to express your opinions in a way that explains what exactly it is that you mean.


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    #7

    Re: question about ['ve got] and [got]

    The Unfolding of Language Guy Deutscher

    Chapter 4: The Forces of Destruction

    'destruction' is a term used to describe the decay process, as you referred to, when 've is swallowed and "we got' emerges.


    r is it your intention to perpetuate the destruction of human dignity and spirit?

    My additional observation as to the occurrence of this type of speech, can do that!?
    soup: Really... ? How so?

    I was asking you. Something about my observation spurred your remark above.

    Are you telling me, that you are taking some outraged moral high ground on behalf of the street-wise of LA and NY??
    Puleeeze!

    Please skip over my posts in future - they are not specifically meant for you, only in response to any further issues that are raised in your post that others and I might ENJOY thrashing out.

    END
    Last edited by David L.; 05-Mar-2009 at 21:10.

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    #8

    Re: question about ['ve got] and [got]

    I think that ommitting the auxiliary in connected speech is not confined to the social groups David says; people well aware of the present perfect might skip it when speaking fast.


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    #9

    Re: question about ['ve got] and [got]

    Thank you for all the answers and advice.
    I am an English learner and only asking a simple English-related question.
    I have no intension of degrading the English language.
    Last edited by bouji; 06-Mar-2009 at 04:46.


    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #10

    Re: question about ['ve got] and [got]

    C'mon guys, lest our foreign visitors start to think we are prone to verbal violence over a mere difference of opinion.

    Just as someone posted recently regarding the need for complex grammar :-

    " I don't know how I know it is right, I just DO. "

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