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    #1

    very

    Dear teachers,

    I have three questions to ask:

    No.1
    Men of all social classes in the country visit pubs ___.
    a. very b. quite
    The key is 'b'. Could you please explain why 'a' isn't correct?

    No.2
    The fact is that the typical English pub is changing, ___ because of the licensing laws not being so strict as they were.
    a. partly b. in part
    The key is 'a'. Could you please explain why 'b' isn't correct? I ask the question because I found the sentence in the dictionary:
    The deadline for applications is being extended, in part because of the postal strike.
    So it seems 'b' is also correct.

    No.3
    Then he glanced at me and said "End of term?" "The end of university _____me," I said.
    a. for b. to
    The key is 'a'. Could you please explain why 'b' isn't correct?
    Looking foward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    jiang
    Last edited by jiang; 05-Mar-2009 at 09:07.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: very

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear teachers,

    I have three questions to ask:

    No.1
    Men of all social classes in the country visit pubs ___.
    a. very b. quite
    The key is 'b'. Could you please explain why 'a' isn't correct?
    Neither is correct, as both 'very' and 'quite' should be modifying something: "very frequently" or "quite often" (for example - there are lots of other possibilities)

    No.2
    The fact is that the typical English pub is changing, ___ because of the licensing laws not being so strict as they were.
    a. partly b. in part
    The key is 'a'. Could you please explain why 'b' isn't correct? It is. It is possibly less common. I ask the question because I found the sentence in the dictionary:
    The deadline for applications is being extended, in part because of the postal strike.
    So it seems 'b' is also correct.

    No.3
    Then he glanced at me and said "End of term?" "The end of university _____me," I said.
    a. for b. to
    The key is 'a'. Could you please explain why 'b' isn't correct?
    It is referring to the change in your life; that is a change that affects you; it is a change for you. You use "to" when you're talking about a change to your perception: "I never want to see you again. To me you are just a nasty memory."

    Looking foward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    jiang
    I don't think I've explained this last one very well. The distinction isn't very clear, and sometimes you can use either: in my last example - for example - you could use 'for'. Perhaps some other teacher would like to have a go.

    b

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    #3

    Re: very

    Dear BobK,
    Thank very much for your explanation. I understand No.2 and No.3 now.

    I made a serious mistake as to No.1. The sentence should be
    Men of all social classes in the country visit pubs ___ regularly.
    a. very b. quite
    The key is 'b'. According to your explanation I guess the key is 'b' because we should say "quite regularly". Is that right?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I don't think I've explained this last one very well. The distinction isn't very clear, and sometimes you can use either: in my last example - for example - you could use 'for'. Perhaps some other teacher would like to have a go.

    b

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: very

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear BobK,
    Thank very much for your explanation. I understand No.2 and No.3 now.

    I made a serious mistake as to No.1. The sentence should be
    Men of all social classes in the country visit pubs ___ regularly.
    a. very b. quite
    The key is 'b'. According to your explanation I guess the key is 'b' because we should say "quite regularly". Is that right?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    In a very few contexts it would be possible to say 'very regularly', but only when there's strong contrastive stress on the "very" - in an argument say:

    'The regulations require you to attend meetings regularly.'
    'But I do - very regularly.'


    But 'quite regularly' is a much better answer here.

    b

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    #5

    Re: very

    Dear BobK,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.
    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    In a very few contexts it would be possible to say 'very regularly', but only when there's strong contrastive stress on the "very" - in an argument say:

    'The regulations require you to attend meetings regularly.'
    'But I do - very regularly.'

    But 'quite regularly' is a much better answer here.

    b

  3. Soup's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: very

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post

    No.3
    Then he glanced at me and said "End of term?" "The end of university _____me," I said.

    a. for
    b. to

    The key is 'a'. Could you please explain why 'b' isn't correct?
    Use for to express a benefit or the opposite there of; use to to express movement or a destination towards.

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