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    • Join Date: Sep 2008
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    #1

    "admit" vs "admit to"

    1a) "She admitted having stolen the keys"
    1b) "She admitted to having stolen the keys"

    2a) "Is it a sign of strength or weakness for a critic to admit a change of mind?
    2b) "Is it a sign of strength or weakness for a critic to admit to a change of mind?"

    Are all sentences correct? Is there a difference between each pair?

    "admit to" has nothing to do with the passive construction "to be admitted to hospital"´, ok?


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    #2

    Re: "admit" vs "admit to"

    Interesting question.

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    #3

    Re: "admit" vs "admit to"

    Yes, they mean the same thing.

    He admitted to doing his bit. (CGEL by Quirk)


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    #4

    Re: "admit" vs "admit to"

    Not quite, Henz. The difference is interesting, and when I've had a couple of cups of tea -and if nobody else has done it first - I'll be back to tease this one out with both of you..

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    #5

    Re: "admit" vs "admit to"

    Hi, David, you can certainly talk about it over your cups of tea.

    I can't wait to listen to the result.


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    #6

    Re: "admit" vs "admit to"

    'admit' means 'confess that something is true, or is the case, typically with reluctance'.

    'admitted to' takes this further, and would be used when
    1. the person has been charged with 2 or more crimes, but 'admits to' having only committed one (or fewer than all of the charges made):
    "She admitted to having stolen the keys, but denies being responsible for the thefts of money that have been going on in the dorm."
    dorm: short for 'dormitory'(=a large bedroom for a number of people in a school or institution.
    and
    a university or college hall of residence or hostel.


    2. When there are degrees of a crime, and the person will admit having perpetrated a lower degree than the original charge:
    "He admits to Gross Bodily Harm, but denies Attempted Murder."

    Note the tenses in the two sentences in blue. Anything strike any non-native speaker?

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    #7

    Re: "admit" vs "admit to"

    Thank you!

    "He admits to Gross Bodily Harm, but denies Attempted Murder."


    Is this a historic present tense?


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    #8

    Re: "admit" vs "admit to"

    No. Simple Present tense. When I wrote it, I was thinking "The Closer" and such like: imagine a detective has just been grilling their prime suspect, and he is now reporting progress in obtaining a full confession to his superior. He is merely reporting facts as they 'presently' stand.

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    #9

    Re: "admit" vs "admit to"

    Use either admit that or admit to. Examples:
    He admitted that he was the one responsible.
    He admitted to committing the crime.

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