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  1. tareq10's Avatar
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    #1

    present perfect

    Would you please help me understand this sentence?

    why isn't the sentence below correct?

    He has retired in April.

    Doesn't it mean that he has retired and he does still?



  2. buggles's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: present perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by tareq10 View Post
    Would you please help me understand this sentence?

    why isn't the sentence below correct?

    He has retired in April.

    Doesn't it mean that he has retired and he does still?

    Can't help you with the rules of grammar involved, but a native speaker would say...


    "He retired in April."

    That means he retired then and is still retired now.

    We might also say.....

    "He has been retired since April." ............to mean the same thing.

    buggles(not ateacher)

  3. tareq10's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: present perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by buggles View Post
    Can't help you with the rules of grammar involved, but a native speaker would say...


    "He retired in April."

    That means he retired then and is still retired now.

    We might also say.....

    "He has been retired since April." ............to mean the same thing.

    buggles(not ateacher)
    Thanks very much.

    I hope I can overcome this tense,(The present perfect)

    One last question, the sentence "He retired in April." is past simple. so it can carry two meanings:
    1- He retired and then might returned to work or
    2- He retired and is still retired.

    That's why we use the present perfect, which is to show that the action happened and finished, without leaving any doubt.

    If I were a native speaker, I would understand the use of would, also.
    Last edited by tareq10; 09-Mar-2009 at 23:08.

  4. buggles's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: present perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by tareq10 View Post
    Thanks very much.

    I hope I can overcome this tense,(The present perfect)

    One last question, the sentence "He retired in April." is past simple. so it can carry two meanings:
    1- He retired and then might returned to work or
    2- He retired and is still retired.

    That's why we use the present perfect, which is to show that the action happened and finished, without leaving any doubt.

    If I had been a native speaker, I could have understood would, also.
    Probably best to use "He has been retired since April", then, as this can only mean he is retired at the moment and has been since April.


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    #5

    Re: present perfect

    Could also say:
    He had retired in April.

    That implies that he retired in April but has since returned to work. It could be awkward though without the context.


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    #6

    Re: present perfect

    In using two isolated sentences for discussion, we are missing the essential difference between these two tense forms.

    If a speaker says, "He retired in April" FULL STOP, then from the speaker's point of view, the man must still be retired from his former employment. The tense indicates that the action is over, done, and compete. If he is aware that the retiree may have some other part-time or full-time work now, he might say,"He retired from teaching in April." OR "He retired in April but went back to work in the September."

    Even if he changed his mind and went back to work as a teacher, it would still be, "He retired in April........(became bored, and decided to return to teaching in third term."

    The Present Perfect is used if the speaker is looking back from NOW as he speaks, and sees the period of time since the retirement as relevant to NOW:
    "He has been retired since April and still hasn't had a cheque from his pension fund."
    A person would utter, "Yes, and he's been retired since April" FULL STOP if this perspective was appropriate from the context of the conversation to that point.

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