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    #1

    hit it off = liked each other = worked well with each other

    Dear teachers,

    Here is a sentence which involves an interesting idiom, namely “hit it off” = get along well together, as in “I was so glad that our parents hit it off.”

    Anita was small and blond and full of life; she seemed to hit it off with Lizzy straight away.

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether the following sentences are interchangeable to a not inconsiderable degree?

    They liked each other immediately.
    They really hit it off.
    There was really good chemistry between them.
    They were greatly impressed with each other.
    They worked well with each other.
    They worked in harmony with each other.
    They made a good team.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

    • Member Info
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      • American English
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      • United States
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    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 907
    #2

    Re: hit it off = liked each other = worked well with each other

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Here is a sentence which involves an interesting idiom, namely “hit it off” = get along well together, as in “I was so glad that our parents hit it off.”

    Anita was small and blond and full of life; she seemed to hit it off with Lizzy straight away.

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether the following sentences are interchangeable to a not inconsiderable degree?

    They liked each other immediately.
    They really hit it off.
    There was really good chemistry between them.
    I would say the first three sentences are interchangeable.
    They were greatly impressed with each other. To be impressed with someone is not the same as 'hitting it off', which implies an instant feeling of, as you say, 'good chemistry.' To be impressed with someone implies that you have thought about them or observed them for some period of time.
    They worked well with each other.
    They worked in harmony with each other.
    They made a good team.
    These three sentences are very similar to each other. Again, they are not the same as 'hit it off', because they each imply the passage of time, whereas 'hitting it off' implies a more or less spontaneous reaction.
    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    I hope this is helpful,

    Petra

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