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    • Join Date: Nov 2008
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    #1

    Smile tsp, tbsp and cup

    Dear teachers:

    When I read cooking articles, I have problem to understand the exact quantity of ingredients of the recipe, such as tsp(teaspoon), tbsp(tablespoon), cup.

    What is the quantity of a tsp, a tbsp, and a cup?

    Could anyone please show me the pictures of a tsp, a tbsp and a cup for me to understand them clearly and exactly?

    Thanks a lot in advance.
    Last edited by studying; 12-Mar-2009 at 04:08.


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    #2

    Re: tsp, tbsp and cup

    anyone helps?


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    #3

    Re: tsp, tbsp and cup

    Cooking Measurement Equivalents — Infoplease.com

    A teaspoon is slightly smaller than a dessert/tablespoon, and is intended for used with a teacup.

    You can buy se ts of measuring spoons amd cups which cuts out all the hassle of working out equivalents.

    Measuring Cup Set 18/8 SS. Large Collection of Professional Measuring Equipment - Food Utensils

  1. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #4


    • Join Date: Nov 2008
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    #5

    Re: tsp, tbsp and cup

    Thanks so much for Anglika and Charlie Bernstein's information and pictures.

    I'm clear now. I was confused because when I searched teaspoon and tablespoon on google, it shows almost the same pictures

    Another question here now,

    Is the spoon like this shape a tablespoon or teaspoon
    http://www.vetus-shop.com/images/4305_Teaspoon.jpg
    which I think it's a tablespoon now.

    I think the spoon like this shape is a teaspoon
    http://www.oneinhundred.com/upfiles/...ri-4875488.jpg

    https://www.backpackinglight.com/bac...um_spoon_L.jpg

    http://www.tablewareshop.co.uk/catal...20teaspoon.jpg

    and this irefers to a cup, too.
    http://www.geekervision.com/50226711/apex-cup.jpg

    Am I right?
    Last edited by studying; 14-Mar-2009 at 07:26.


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    #6

    Re: tsp, tbsp and cup

    Tablespoons, dessert spoons and teaspoons do look alike. They are all designed for similar purposes. It is not shape but size that differentiates them. Table spoons were intended to serve food so are the biggest, desserts spoons are for eating, and teaspoons are for stirring the tea in a tea cup. There are also coffee spoons which are even smaller, as coffee cups were traditionally smaller than teacups.

    In this image, a tea cup on the left, a coffee cup on the right: http://www.steppeshillfarm.com/asp4/images/DN18.jpg
    Last edited by Anglika; 14-Mar-2009 at 11:43.


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    #7

    Re: tsp, tbsp and cup

    Quote Originally Posted by studying View Post
    Thanks so much for Anglika and Charlie Bernstein's information and pictures.

    I'm clear now. I was confused because when I searched teaspoon and tablespoon on google, it shows almost the same pictures

    Another question here now,

    Is the spoon like this shape a tablespoon or teaspoon
    http://www.vetus-shop.com/images/4305_Teaspoon.jpg
    which I think it's a tablespoon now. Looks to me like a standard dessert spoon for eating with.

    I think the spoon like this shape is a teaspoon
    http://www.oneinhundred.com/upfiles/...ri-4875488.jpg
    This is a coffee measure, for putting the right amount of coffee groudns into a coffee pot.
    https://www.backpackinglight.com/bac...um_spoon_L.jpg

    Another measuring spoon, this time for taking with you when camping.

    http://www.tablewareshop.co.uk/catal...20teaspoon.jpg

    a spoon designed for eating desserts in tall glasses - a "sundae" spoon.

    and this irefers to a cup, too.
    http://www.geekervision.com/50226711/apex-cup.jpg

    Paper/plastic beakers for use with vending machines.

    Am I right?
    ..
    Last edited by Anglika; 14-Mar-2009 at 11:40.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: tsp, tbsp and cup

    Quote Originally Posted by studying View Post
    ...
    Is the spoon like this shape a tablespoon or teaspoon
    http://www.vetus-shop.com/images/4305_Teaspoon.jpg
    which I think it's a tablespoon now.
    ...
    Given the name of the image, I should think it's a fair bet that it's a teaspoon!

    As Anglika says, the difference between teaspoons, dessert spoons, and table spoons is chiefly in their relative lengths.

    Incidentally, I expect one of the links Anglika posted explains this in more detail, but an Imperial pint is not the same as an American pint, and an American cup is a much larger measure than a typical English cup (though Br Eng recipes don't use cups as units of measurement anyway as a matter of course - though occasionally, in an American-like recipe [brownies, for example] they may use the American measure).

    b

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    #9

    Re: tsp, tbsp and cup

    Dear Studying:

    The system you see in cookbooks can be frustrating and confusing. One important thing to remember:

    The amounts called for in cookbooks that use this system are almost always measures of volume.
    The names teaspoon, tablespoon, cup, etc. can also be used to name common kitchen objects.
    When a recipe calls for 2 tablesoons (also sometimes written tbs, or just T), it is referring to a measure of volume. Cooks use any number of commercially made utensils to measure the ingredients. They very often do not look at all like the tableware you might call a tablespoon (or cup or tsp. or etc.)
    In my English classes, we spend time playing around with these measures, because almost all of my students have grown up with the far simpler metric system of grams and liters.

    For a look at various commercial measuring utensils, go to

    Kitchen Tools - Measuring Instruments

    where you will find four pages (!) of them with photos.

    All best wishes,

    Petra

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